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Andy Murray fights back tears as he announces retirement plans

Andrew Hendrie in ATP Tour 11 Jan 2019
  • Murray says he will retire at Wimbledon at the latest
  • Former No. 1 reveals he might even be forced to hang up the racquet after the Australian Open
  • Scot says he can't put his socks and shoes on without pain
An emotional Andy Murray during his press conference (Photo by Scott Barbour/Getty Images)

An emotional Andy Murray has outlined plans to retire at Wimbledon this year, but concedes that the Australian Open could be the final tournament of his career.

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A chronic hip injury has plagued Murray for the last couple of years, with the former World No. 1 biting the bullet and undergoing surgery in Melbourne 12 months ago. However, the surgery hasn’t erased the pain as Murray revealed he is playing with limitations and can barely put his socks on without a struggle.

“The pain is too much really. I don’t want to continue playing that way,” Murray said through tears during a press conference at Melbourne Park on Friday morning.
“Wimbledon is where I would like to stop playing but I am not certain I am able to do that,” Murray added. “I’m not sure I can play through the pain for another four or five months.
“Pretty much done everything that I could to try and get my hip feeling better and it hasn’t helped loads, I think there is a chance the Australian Open is my last tournament,” he said.

Andy Murray (Photo by WILLIAM WEST/AFP/Getty Images)
Murray intends to play the Australian Open, where he has drawn Doha champion and No. 22 seed Roberto Bautista Agut in the first round, but says it could possibly be his final tournament.

Needing to leave the room in order to regain his composure, Murray fought back more tears as he said the pain around his hip was affecting his love of the sport.

"I can play with limitations. But having the limitations and the pain is not allowing me to enjoy competing or training,” he said.
“Been struggling for a long time, I’ve been in a lot of pain for probably about 20 months. I’ve pretty much done everything I could get my hip feeling better.
“I’m in a better place than I was six months ago but I’m still in a lot of pain. It’s been tough.”



A five-time runner-up at the Australian Open, Murray missed last year’s tournament as he went under the knife in Melbourne.

The Scot was sidelined for the next six months, returning during the grass season but deciding not to play Wimbledon because his body wasn’t ready for best-of-five-set matches. Murray went on to play the U.S. Open Series, reaching the Round of 16 at the Citi Open and the second round of the U.S. Open, before shutting down his season in September after the Shenzhen Open.

Murray’s first round clash with Bautista Agut is scheduled for Monday.


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Andy Murray fights back tears as he announces retirement plans

An emotional Andy Murray has outlined plans to retire at Wimbledon this year, but concedes that the Australian Open could be the final tournament of his career.

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