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Zverev vs Coric US Open tennis live streaming, preview and predictions

Alexander Zverev has a golden opportunity at the US Open – if he can overturn a losing record against quarterfinal opponent Borna Coric.

Zverev vs Coric is live from New York on Tuesday 8 September, 1.30pm local/6.30pm BST

A semifinalist at the Australian Open in January, Germany’s Alexander Zverev has a chance to match that result at the US Open – and with no Novak Djokovic blocking the way to the final, possibly go further and finally reach that Grand Slam title match it feels like he’s always been destined for.

US Open 2020: Tournament information, schedules, latest news and live streaming information for the resilient Grand Slam in New York

But standing in Zverev’s way is Borna Coric, the determined Croatian who saved six match points earlier in the tournament and has a winning record against the German.

Read on for our preview, predictions and live streaming information.

How to watch Zverev vs Coric live

US Open matches including Alexander Zverev vs Borna Coric are streamed live alongside odds and in-play betting at bet365.

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Zverev vs Coric: Head-to-head

Borna Coric leads the head-to-head 3-1. He won their first two matches in 2015 and at the US Open in 2017 before Zverev beat him at the Miami Masters in 2018. Coric won their most recent meeting, which came on grass in Halle in 2018.

Zverev vs Coric: Preview

As with Shapovalov vs Carreno Busta, the player who trails 1-3 in the head-to-head is actually favoured to win this and that’s Sascha Zverev.
Not many people would have predicted him reaching a semifinal, not with Stefanos Tsitsipas as his projected quarterfinal opponent, but Tsitsipas fell victim to Coric and his own failure to convert one of six match points he held against the Croatian earlier in the tournament.

Zverev looked to have a tougher draw than Tsitsipas coming into the US Open, but it’s the German who’s still here after four rounds, and he hasn’t once gone to five sets – a significant improvement on some of his other major campaigns. He dropped sets against Kevin Anderson, Brandon Nakashima and Adrian Mannarino before taking care of business in efficient straight sets against Alejandro Davidovich Fokina, who was troubled with a foot injury, in the last 16.

Borna Coric has played two five-set matches at the US Open (PA Images)

It’s been decent, but Zverev has yet to really shine for me at this tournament, and the chances are he’ll have to do just that against Coric. The Croatian might regret the energy he expended against Juan Ignacio Londero in the second round, going five sets with the Argentine; coupled with the Tsitsipas match, that’s a lot of emotional energy expended as much as physical and Coric does have a history filled with injuries. The 23-year-old dominated proceedings among Jordan Thompson, and as aforementioned, he has a very good record against Zverev; I don’t find it hard to see why, because Zverev has a tendency to sit back and rally, trying to outgrind his opponent and waiting for errors. Not only does Coric not tend to give up errors in the kind of numbers that would make this a winning strategy, but he’s all too likely to take the opportunity to come in and attack.

Big serving will be key for Zverev: Big serving and a proactive attitude. I think it will be a long match, and he’ll find himself having to outlast Coric as anything, but the German has a real opportunity here. I don’t think he’ll waste it.

Zverev vs Coric: Prediction

Can Stefanos Tsitsipas beat Borna Coric to reach the fourth round of the US Open for the first time?

Tsitsipas vs Coric is live from New York on Friday 4 September, time TBC

Fourth seed Stefanos Tsitsipas has yet to drop a set at this year’s US Open, the first edition of the tournament at which he has succeeded in winning back-to-back matches.

US Open 2020: Tournament information, schedules, latest news and live streaming information for the resilient Grand Slam in New York

The Greek looks for his first last-16 berth in New York as he takes on Borna Coric, hoping to make the fourth round of the US Open for the second time.

Read on for our preview, predictions and live streaming information.

How to watch Tsitsipas vs Coric live

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Tsitsipas vs Coric: Head-to-head

There has only been one previous match between Stefanos Tsitsipas and Borna Coric, and that ended when Coric retired trailing 1-4 at the Rome Masters in 2018.

Tsitsipas vs Coric: Preview

World no. 6 Tsitsipas had never won back-to-back matches at the US Open before this year, but he had good preparation at the Western & Southern Open last week when he beat a succession of big servers to reach the semifinals before losing to Milos Raonic. And he had a good draw – one that’s getting better, too: The winner of his third-round clash with Coric won’t have to face a seeded player but instead either Jordan Thompson or Mikhail Kukushkin.

Tsitsipas, who was unlucky to have to face Andrey Rublev in the first round last year, has yet to drop a set at this year’s US Open, dusting two very different players in straights to reach the last 32: First veteran Albert Ramos-Vinolas, who it has to be said didn’t really look prepared to play, then wildcard Maxime Cressy, an American wildcard who turned out to be a serve-and-volley player. It’s rare that someone steals Tsitsipas’s thunder at the net that way, but the ATP Finals champion turned out to be more than capable of dealing with it, seeing off Cressy 7-6(2), 6-3, 6-4 in two and a half hours. He saved all four break points he faced, and has yet to be broken at this year’s US Open.

US Open Predictions and Betting Tips: Outright winner tips for men’s & women’s singles at the 2020 US Open

Given Cressy’s game, and the type of players he faced at the Western & Southern Open last week – Kevin Anderson, John Isner, Reilly Opelka and Raonic – Tsitsipas has clearly got into a good groove when it comes to taking on big servers who keep points short on these fast courts.

Borna Coric (PA Images)

Borna Coric will be a complete change of pace. The 23-year-old is much more in the baselining, even counterpunching mould. Two years older than Tsitsipas, Coric had his breakthrough all the way back in 2014 when he reached the semifinals of Basel, but it’s been an up-and-down ride since then for the Croatian as injury and inconsistency intervened.

Coric had his best season in 2018 when he reached world no. 12 after winning Halle, finishing runner-up in Shanghai and making the semifinals of the Indian Wells Masters (beating Roger Federer twice in the process). His 27-22 season in 2019 was a bit of a letdown by comparison, although it still had some highlights (having to give a walkover in the second round of the US Open not being one of them).

Coric went 1-5 in his first three tournaments of 2020, losing in the first round of the Australian Open to Sam Querrey, and had only just started to find his feet with a run to the semifinals of Santiago before the ATP Tour shut down. One of the unlucky players to contract COVID-19 during the hiatus, Coric doesn’t seem to have been too badly hit by it; he lost to David Goffin at the Western & Southern Open after beating an off-colour Benoit Paire, who ultimately retired after losing the first seven games of the match, but any lingering physical weakness would have been exposed by his second-round battle with Juan Ignacio Londero. Coric had to come back from two sets to one down in the four-hour, 22-minute match.

This will be the first real meeting between Tsitsipas and Coric, and while Coric’s game can be effective against aggressive players as he soaks up pressure with his excellent movement and defense before transitioning into attack, he hasn’t really shown very good form recently. I think the Croatian will take a set, but a disciplined attacking performance from Tsitsipas should see him neatly into the last 16.

Tsitsipas vs Coric: Prediction

Nick Kyrgios embroiled in acrimonious exchanges with ‘boring ass’ Borna Coric over pandemic safety.

The war of words between Nick Kyrgios and Borna Coric continues to escalate on Twitter, with Coric accusing Kyrgios of ‘preaching about behaviour’ while Kyrgios responded that Coric’s tennis and personality are ‘boring ass’ and bring ‘absolutely zero to the sport’.

The 25-year-old Australian has been forthright on social media about his unfavourable view of the players who participated in Novak Djokovic’s ill-fated Adria Tour, which was cancelled after several players tested positive for COVID-19.

Kyrgios was also scathing about the behaviour of Alexander Zverev, who did not test positive but was filmed partying in a crowded bar a few days after he had promised to self-isolate.

Borna Coric, one of those players who tested positive for COVID-19 after participating in the Adria Tour, drew Kyrgios’s ire after he suggested that the Australian ‘likes being a general after the battle’.

‘Zverev behaved badly, but I don’t understand the need to criticise a colleague like that,’ Coric said.

Kyrgios shot back with some unflattering remarks about Coric’s intelligence (‘intellectual level = 0’) and asking ‘Do you have rocks in your head?’

Coric did not take kindly to Kyrgios’s inferences, enquiring sarcastically whether Kyrgios – who has had a string of run-ins with authority, most recently being given a suspended ban of 16 weeks and a fine of $113,000 after an ATP investigation found a pattern of verbal abuse of officials and spectators – was really in a position to lecture others.

 

Kyrgios derided Coric for making light of the global health crisis, but rather undercut his attempt to take the moral high ground by claiming that he was ‘a tad bored watching your boring ass tennis and personality bringing absolutely zero to the game’.

 

When journalist Ben Rothenberg, with whom Kyrgios has also had run-ins in the past, drew attention to the tweets, Kyrgios underlined his point, claiming it was ‘embarrassing’ to compare his antics on the court, such as swearing at officials, to engaging in risky behaviours during a global pandemic.

Kyrgios has previously criticised the USTA’s attempts to go ahead with the US Open, currently scheduled to be played behind closed doors in New York as part of a two-tournament bubble with the Wesetrn & Southern Open, calling them ‘selfish’. While Kyrgios’s name appeared on the player entry list for the Western & Southern Open, the Australian was quick to confirm that he won’t be participating, following in the footsteps of compatriot Ashleigh Barty; the world no. 1 released a statement on Thursday that she won’t be travelling to the USA for the Western & Southern Open and US Open, citing ‘significant risks involved’.

Nick Kyrgios escalates war of words with Borna Coric and claims he’s trying to hold fellow players ‘accountable’ for poor COVID-19 decisions.

There may have been some British beef at the Battle of the Brits this week, but Australia’s Kyrgios has upped the ante once more with some spuds and a doughnut for dessert as the fallout from Novak Djokovic’s Adria Tour continues to rumble on.

Kyrgios was one of the most vociferous critics of the exhibition series, which was cancelled after a slew of players including Grigor Dimitrov, Djokovic himself and Croatia’s Borna Coric tested positive for COVID-19. Social distancing measures were not observed, to say the least, during the tour, which aimed to raise funds for relief projects in the Balkan region.

Among other things, Kyrgios called the tour ‘boneheaded’. He was also vocal in his disapproval when Alexander Zverev, who had participated in the Adria Tour and publicly declared that he was self-isolating, was filmed partying at an extremely crowded bar – behaviour Kyrgios described as ‘idiotic’.

Kyrgios’s comments were not well received by Boris Becker, who said he didn’t like ‘rats’, or by world no. 3 Dominic Thiem, who said that Kyrgios should ‘come clean instead of criticising others’. ‘This just shows what a joke [Thiem, Zverev and Djokovic] think this is, 2 of them partying like potato’s during a global pandemic,’ Kyrgios shot back.

Now world no. 33 Borna Coric has got involved, telling Croatian newspaper Jutarjni that Kyrgios ‘enjoys being a general after battle’.

Coric said:

‘I read what he wrote, but I don’t care. He enjoys being a general after battle. Coming from someone else, I might have understood, but Kyrgios … It’s not really realistic.

‘It’s his style, he works like that, there is no problem. Zverev behaved badly, but I don’t understand the need to criticize a colleague like that. I wouldn’t have. But, again, it’s Kyrgios.’

Predictably, Kyrgios picked up on the comments via social media and defended himself, riposting: ‘You should care. Do you have rocks in your head?’

 

Kyrgios also exhorted Coric to read recent comments about the condition Dimitrov found himself in after his bout of COVID-19. The world no. 19, the first player to test positive on the Adria Tour who then found himself blamed by the Djokovic family, admitted this weekend that he is very doubtful to play the US Open after losing 3kgs in weight, being kept off court entirely for a month and still struggling with his energy level amidst bouts of fatigue.

 

The Australian continued to showcase his creativity in exchanges with Djokovic fans, calling the same person a ‘quail’, a ‘pelican’ and an ‘albatross’.

Kyrgios has also been extremely sceptical about the prospect of the US Open taking place, as it is scheduled to do, from 31 August-13 September behind closed doors in New York.