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Wimbledon

Wimbledon

Wimbledon 2020

Widely regarded as the most iconic tournament in tennis, The Championships – best known as simply ‘Wimbledon’ – takes place from Monday 1 June 29 to Sunday 12 July 2020.

The very best men’s and women’s tennis has to offer will once again be on display on the famous lawns of SW19, led by defending champions Novak Djokovic and Simona Halep.

Wimbledon Live Streaming

Wimbledon tennis is live from June 29 to July 12, 2020, with play starting at 11.00am BST. Bookmaker bet365 are offering customers the opportunity to watch a live stream of the match alongside in-play betting.

Watch and bet on Wimbledon tennis live at bet365 > live streaming > tennis (geo-restrictions apply; funded account required or to have placed a bet in the last 24 hours to qualify)

How to watch and bet on Wimbledon tennis:

1. Visit the bet365 website

2. Sign into your account or register for a new one

3. Select Live Streaming

4. Select ‘Tennis’ from the ‘All Sports’ dropdown menu

5. Enjoy a live stream & in-play betting for Wimbledon tennis, live from June 29 to July 12, 2020.

PLEASE NOTE: You must have a funded account or have placed a bet in the last 24 hours in order to watch tennis; geo-restrictions apply.

Wimbledon Tournament Schedule

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Wimbledon Order Of Play

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About Wimbledon

The oldest tennis tournament in the world, Wimbledon – also known simply as The Championships – has been held at the All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club (AELTC) in south-west London since 1877.

Of the four Grand Slams, Wimbledon is the only one still played on grass courts since the Australian Open shifted to hard courts in 1988.

The iconic event retains the traditional elements from tennis’s polite, amateur past; including a strict dress code for the competitors, who all wear white; Royal patronage; no play on the middle Sunday of the event; the absence of sponsor advertising around the courts; and the conspicuous consumption of strawberries and cream.

That doesn’t mean Wimbledon hasn’t evolved with the times, however. Prize money was first offered to competitors in 1968, the first year that professional players were allowed to compete in The Championships, and men and women have been paid equal prize money since 2007. With the unpredictable British summer often leading to rain, a retractable roof was installed over Centre Court and has been in operation since 2009, with No. 1 Court to be roofed. The All-England Club also features the Aorangi Terrace, a large outdoor area where fans watch matches on a giant screen, popularly known as ‘Henman Hill’ after British player Tim Henman. It is also known as ‘Murray Mound’ in recent years after Andy Murray became the first British man since Fred Perry in 1936 to win Wimbledon in 2013. Virginia Wade was the last British women to win Wimbledon in 1977.

Wimbledon is broadcast by the BBC on every day of The Championships and attracts huge television audiences around the world. New legends are added to the myth of Wimbledon every year, such as the 183-game match between John Isner and Nicolas Mahut on Court 18 in 2010, which Isner won 70-68 in the fifth set; and the iconic 2008 men’s final between Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal, widely regarded as the greatest match of all time.

Roger Federer holds the record for most men’s titles at Wimbledon in the Open Era with eight, one ahead of Pete Sampras, while Federer (2003-7) and Bjorn Borg (1976-80) are tied for the most consecutive singles titles. Rafael Nadal and Andy Murray both have two titles, while defending champion Novak Djokovic has three.

On the women’s side, Martina Navratilova holds the Open Era record with nine Wimbledon titles and also holds the record for most consecutive women’s titles, winning six between 1982 and 1987. Among active players, Serena Williams holds the record for most titles with six, just edging out sister Venus’ five, while Maria Sharapova (2004) and Petra Kvitova (2011 and 2014) have also captured the prize at the All England Club.