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ATP Finals

Latest ATP Finals News

The 2020 Nitto ATP Finals takes place from 15-22 November at the O2 Arena in London. Watch and bet on ATP Finals tennis and get live stream access with livetennis.com.

ATP Finals Live Stream

ATP Finals tennis is live from the O2 Arena in London, United Kingdom from 15-22 November, with play starting around 12pm GMT. Bookmaker bet365 are offering customers the opportunity to watch a live stream of the matches alongside in-play betting.

Watch and bet on ATP tennis live at bet365 > live streaming > tennis (geo-restrictions apply; funded account required or to have placed a bet in the last 24 hours to qualify)

How to watch & bet on ATP tennis

1. Visit the bet365 website

2. Sign into your account or register for a new one

3. Select Live Streaming

4. Select ‘Tennis’ from the ‘All Sports’ drop down menu

5. Enjoy a live stream & in-play betting for ATP Finals tennis, live from London’s O2 Arena from 15-22 November 2020

PLEASE NOTE: You must have a funded account or have placed a bet in the last 24 hours in order to watch tennis; geo-restrictions apply.

ATP Finals 2020 Tournament Schedule

Nitto ATP Finals 2020

Date – Time Event Name Location
Sunday 15 November 12pm GMT Round-robin doubles & singles match #1 O2 Arena, London
Sunday 15 November 6pm GMT Round-robin doubles & singles match #2 O2 Arena, London
Monday 16 November 12pm GMT Round-robin doubles & singles match #3 O2 Arena, London
Monday 16 November 6pm GMT Round-robin doubles & singles match #4 O2 Arena, London
Tuesday 17 November 12pm GMT Round-robin doubles & singles match #5 O2 Arena, London
Tuesday 17 November 6pm GMT Round-robin doubles & singles match #6 O2 Arena, London
Wednesday 18 November 12pm GMT Round-robin doubles & singles match #7 O2 Arena, London
Wednesday 18 November 6pm GMT Round-robin doubles & singles match #8 O2 Arena, London
Thursday 19 November 12pm GMT Round-robin doubles & singles match #9 O2 Arena, London
Thursday 19 November 6pm GMT Round-robin doubles & singles match #10 O2 Arena, London
Friday 20 November 12pm GMT Round-robin doubles & singles match #11 O2 Arena, London
Friday 20 November 6pm GMT Round-robin doubles & singles match #12 O2 Arena, London
Saturday 21 November 12pm GMT Doubles semifinal #1, followed by singles semifinal #1 O2 Arena, London
Saturday 21 November 6pm GMT Doubles semifinal #2, followed by singles semifinal #2 O2 Arena, London
Sunday 22 November 3.30pm GMT Doubles final O2 Arena, London
Sunday 22 November 6pm GMT Singles final O2 Arena, London

When is the 2020 ATP Finals?

The Nitto ATP Finals 2020 takes place from 15-22 November at the O2 Arena, London.

It is the last time the season-ending championships will be played at the O2 Arena, its home since 2009. The ATP Finals moves to Turin, Italy from 2021.

Due to the global health crisis and the UK’s current national lockdown, the 2020 Nitto ATP Finals will be played behind closed doors.

ATP Finals Players 2020

The Nitto ATP Finals features the eight players who have accumulated the most ranking points over the calendar year – i.e. the players who have performed the best that season.

Players are divided into two groups of four, in which they compete in round-robin matches through the first six days of the tournament with the top two players in each group progressing to the semifinals.

Due to the truncated tennis season in 2020, with the sport shut down completely for the best part of six months due to the global health crisis, the 2020 Nitto ATP Finals player field has been determined by the official ATP Tour rankings – but it is still as strong as ever, with titans Novak Djokovic and Rafael Nadal leading the ‘elite eight’.

Five-time champion Novak Djokovic leads the field at the Nitto ATP Finals in 2020 (PA Images)

Novak Djokovic

World no. 1 Novak Djokovic is currently in a three-way tie for second place on the all-time ATP Finals title leaders list and is looking to tie Roger Federer’s record of six titles as he leads the field in London once more in 2020.

Djokovic last triumphed in 2015, although he has reached the final twice in subsequent years. The Serb claimed his 17th Grand Slam title at the Australian Open in January and won his first 37 completed matches of 2020 before losing to Rafael Nadal in the final of the French Open. He has a 36-14 record at the ATP Finals.

Rafael Nadal won his 13th French Open title in 2020 (PA Images)

Rafael Nadal

Spain’s Nadal may have ceded the world no. 1 ranking to Djokovic at the start of the year when he lost in the quarterfinals of the Australian Open, but the 34-year-old claimed his first title of 2020 at the Acapulco 500 before returning from the six-month shutdown to win an incredible thirteenth French Open title.

Nadal’s straight-sets defeat of Djokovic in the Roland Garros final saw him tie Federer’s record of 20 major titles – and he can claim another victory in the battle to be known as the greatest of all time should he win the ATP Finals in 2020, a title which has eluded him despite nine previous appearances.

Dominic Thiem returns to the ATP Finals as a Grand Slam champion in 2020 (Arata Yamaoka/Kommersant/Sipa USA)

Dominic Thiem

Runner-up at the ATP Finals in 2019, when he defeated Djokovic, Federer and Alexander Zverev only to fall to Stefanos Tsitsipas in the final, Thiem became the first new male Grand Slam champion in six years when he won the US Open, defeating Zverev in the final.

Thiem, who also made the Australian Open final in January, is 22-7 in 2020 and will be making his fifth appearance at the ATP Finals.

Daniil Medvedev returns to the ATP Finals in 2020 (PA Images)

Daniil Medvedev

Medvedev made his ATP Finals debut in 2019 after a season which saw him capture Masters 1000 Series titles in Cincinnati and Shanghai and reach the final of the US Open, but went 0-3 in singles matches at the O2 Arena.

Medvedev will be hoping to do better at the 2020 season-ending championships after reaching the semifinals of the US Open in August and making quarterfinals in Marseille, Cincinnati and Vienna.

Stefanos Tsitsipas will attempt to defend his ATP Finals title in 2020 (Photo: Andre Chaco/Fotoarena)

Stefanos Tsitsipas

Not since Federer in Houston in 2003-4 has a player successfully defended their debut ATP Finals title, but that’s the challenge facing Tsitsipas in 2020.

The 22-year-old Greek defeated Medvedev, Zverev, Federer and Thiem to claim the title in 2019 on what was his first appearance at the season-ending championships. In 2020, he made the semifinals of the French Open, claimed his fifth career title in Marseille and reached ATP 500 finals in Dubai and Hamburg.

Alexander Zverev is one of four previous ATP Finals champions in the field (Photo: Andre Chaco/Fotoarena)

Alexander Zverev

Germany’s Zverev made his ATP Finals debut in 2017 and went on to win the title in 2018, accomplishing the rare feat of beating Federer and Djokovic back-to-back at the same tournament.

A semifinalist in 2019 before losing to Thiem, Zverev returns to the O2 Arena in 2020 after a season which saw him make his first Grand Slam final at the US Open. Zverev also reached the semifinals of the Australian Open and won back-to-back 250 titles on indoor hard courts in Cologne.

Andrey Rublev will be making his ATP Finals debut in 2020 (Vienna EP_sro)

Andrey Rublev

Joining compatriot Medvedev in the Nitto ATP Finals field for the first time will be 23-year-old Rublev.

Sidelined by injury issues earlier in his career while others of his generation initially outstripped him, Rublev has compiled a 40-8 win-loss record throughout a sensational season, winning titles in Doha, Adelaide, Hamburg, St Petersburg and Vienna. He broke into the top 10 for the first time and made the quarterfinals of both the US and French Opens.

Diego Schwartzman will be making his debut at the ATP Finals in 2020 (Aurelien Morissard / IP3)

Diego Schwartzman

Joining Andrey Rublev as another first-timer in the Nitto ATP Finals field is Argentina’s Schwartzman, who was the last to seal his spot among the ‘elite eight’.

Affectionately known as ‘Peque’ for his diminutive stature, Schwartzman broke into the top 10 for the first time in 2020 after making his first Masters 1000 Series final at the Rome Masters, where he got his first victory over ‘King of Clay’ Nadal in ten attempts. Schwartzman went on to reach the semifinals of Roland Garros, knocking out two-time finalist Thiem in the quarterfinals, and also reached ATP 250 finals in Cordoba and Cologne.

ATP Finals Player Performance

How have the 2020 ATP Finals field performed in previous years?

Player Appearances Titles Finals 2019 result Win-loss
Novak Djokovic 12 5 (2008, 2012-15) 2 (2016, 2018) RR (went 1-2 with defeats to Thiem and Federer) 36-14
Rafael Nadal 9 0 2 (2010, 2013) RR (went 2-1 with defeat to Zverev) 18-14
Dominic Thiem 4 0 1 (2019) Runner-up (lost to Tsitsipas) 6-8
Daniil Medvedev 1 0 0 RR (lost to Nadal, Tsitsipas and Zverev) 0-3
Stefanos Tsitsipas 1 1 (2019) 0 Champion (d. Thiem) 4-1
Alexander Zverev 3 1 (2018) 0 SF (lost to Thiem) 7-5
Andrey Rublev 0 0 0 0-0
Dominic Thiem 0 0 0 0-0

ATP Finals Tournament Information

Fast facts about the Nitto ATP Finals

ATP Finals Nitto ATP Finals
Dates 15-22 November
Location London, United Kingdom
Venue o2 Arena
Surface Indoor hard courts
Category ATP year-end championship
Draw size Singles: Eight players

Doubles: Eight teams

First played 1970
Most titles Singles: Roger Federer (5)

Doubles: Peter Fleming/John McEnroe (7)

Prize money $5,700,000
Reigning champions Singles: Stefanos Tsitsipas

Doubles: Pierre-Hugues Herbert/Nicolas Mahut

About the ATP Finals

The ATP Tour’s year-end championships, currently known as the Nitto ATP Finals, is the biggest tournament in men’s tennis outside the four Grand Slams: Not because of its player field, which is limited to eight singles combatants and eight doubles team, but because of the ranking points, prize money and above all the prestige which comes with winning the title.

Simply qualifying for the ATP Finals is a milestone achievement in a player’s career, because the tournament player field is made up of the eight players who have accumulated the most ranking points over the course of the calendar year. So, by becoming part of the ‘elite eight’, a player has already demonstrated that they can win more, and bigger, matches than almost anybody else.

The history of the ATP Finals goes all the way back to Tokyo in 1970 when Stan Smith was the inaugural champion of what was then known as the Grand Prix Masters. Over the next 20 years, Guillermo Vilas, John McEnroe, Bjorn Borg and Ivan Lendl all claimed multiple titles. During this phase of the tournament’s history, it was played in multiple cities before settling in New York for 12 years from 1977-89.

In 1990, the ATP (Association of Tennis Professionals) unified the tennis circuit and took over the season-ending tournament, which became known as the ATP World Tour Championships and settled in Frankfurt and Hanover. From 2000-8, it became known as the Tennis Masters Cup.

In 2009, the tournament became known as the ATP World Tour Finals and began what has been its joint-longest and most successful residency in the event’s history at the o2 Arena in London. During this time span, the ATP Finals has seen finals featuring Roger Federer against Rafael Nadal, Nadal against Novak Djokovic, Djokovic against Andy Murray and Djokovic against Federer. In recent years, the year-end championships – now known as the ATP Finals – has seen a spate of first-time champions, with Grigor Dimitrov (2017), Alexander Zverev (2018) and Stefanos Tsitsipas (2019) all breaking through to claim the title.

The ATP Finals will move to Turin, Italy in 2021, the first time the tournament will have been held in a country that is re-establishing itself as a powerhouse in men’s tennis.

Over the years, almost all of the greatest icons of men’s tennis have claimed the ATP Finals title – Rafael Nadal is a rare exception – but the all-time title leader is Roger Federer. The 20-time Grand Slam champion won the title six times between 2003 and 2011 and has reached five additional finals to boot. Ivan Lendl, Pete Sampras and Novak Djokovic are currently tied for second place with five titles each. On the doubles side, the team of Peter Fleming and John McEnroe won the ATP Finals a record seven times between 1978 and 1984.

ATP Finals Player Records

Most titles won

 

Titles Player(s) Year(s)
6 Roger Federer 2003-4, 2006-7, 2010-11
5 Ivan Lendl 1981-2, 1985-7
Pete Sampras 1991, 1994, 1996-7, 1999
Novak Djokovic 2008, 2012-15
4 Ilie Nastase 1971-3, 1975
3 Boris Becker 1988, 1992, 1995
John McEnroe 1978, 1983-4
2 Bjorn Borg 1979-80
Lleyton Hewitt 2001-2
1 Andre Agassi 1990
Stan Smith 1970
Stefan Edberg 1989
Nikolay Davydenko 2009
Guillermo Vilas 1974
Manuel Orantes 1976
Jimmy Connors 1977
Michael Stich 1993
Alex Corretja 1998
Gustavo Kuerten 2000
David Nalbandian 2005
Andy Murray 2016
Grigor Dimitrov 2017
Alexander Zverev 2018
Stefanos Tsitsipas 2019

Most ATP Finals singles match wins

  1. Roger Federer – 59
  2. Ivan Lendl – 39
  3. Boris Becker/Novak Djokovic – 36

Most ATP Finals singles appearances

  1. Roger Federer – 17
  2. Andre Agaassi – 13
  3. Ivan Lendl/Novak Djokovic – 12
  4. Boris Becker/Jimmy Connors/Pete Sampras – 11

ATP Finals Prize Money & Ranking Points

Round Singles Doubles Points
Undefeated Champion $2,871,000 $533,000 1,500
Final $1,354,000 $204,000 500
Semifinal $657,000 $106,000 400
Round Robin $215,000 $40,000 200

 

ATP Finals Champions

Here is a complete list of players who have won singles titles at the ATP Tour’s season-ending championships, currently known as the ATP Finals, since its inception in 1970 as well as the city in which the tournament was held.

City Year Champion Runner-up
Tokyo 1970 Stan Smith Rod Laver
Paris 1971 Ilie Nastase Stan Smith
Barcelona 1972 Ilie Nastase (2) Stan Smith
Boston 1973 Ilie Nastase (3) Tom Okker
Melbourne 1974 Guillermo Vilas Ilie Nastase
Stockholm 1975 Ilie Nastase (4) Bjorn Borg
Houston 1976 Manuel Orantes Wojtak Fibak
New York 1977 Jimmy Connors Bjorn Borg
New York 1978 John McEnroe Arthur Ashe
New York 1979 Bjorn Borg Vitus Gerulaitis
New York 1980 Bjorn Borg (2) Ivan Lendl
New York 1981 Ivan Lendl Vitus Gerulaitis
New York 1982 Ivan Lendl (2) John McEnroe
New York 1983 John McEnroe (2) Ivan Lendl
New York 1984 John McEnroe (3) Ivan Lendl
New York 1985 Ivan Lendl (3) Boris Becker
New York 1986 Ivan Lendl (4) Boris Becker
New York 1987 Ivan Lendl (5) Mats Wilander
New York 1988 Boris Becker Ivan Lendl
New York 1989 Stefan Edberg Boris Becker
Frankfurt 1990 Andre Agassi Stefan Edberg
Frankfurt 1991 Pete Sampras Jim Courier
Frankfurt 1992 Boris Becker (2) Jim Courier
Frankfurt 1993 Michael Stich Pete Sampras
Frankfurt 1994 Pete Sampras (2) Boris Becker
Frankfurt 1995 Boris Becker (3) Michael Chang
Hanover 1996 Pete Sampras (3) Boris Becker
Hanover 1997 Pete Sampras (4) Yevgeny Kafelnikov
Hanover 1998 Alex Corretja Carlos Moya
Hanover 1999 Pete Sampras (5) Andre Agassi
Lisbon 2000 Gustavo Kuerten Andre Agassi
Sydney 2001 Lleyton Hewitt Sebastian Grosjean
Shanghai 2002 Lleyton Hewitt (2) Juan Carlos Ferrero
Houston 2003 Roger Federer Andre Agassi
Houston 2004 Roger Federer (2) Lleyton Hewitt
Lisbon 2000 Gustavo Kuerten Andre Agassi
Shanghai 2005 David Nalbandian Roger Federer
Shanghai 2006 Roger Federer (3) James Blake
Shanghai 2007 Roger Federer (4) David Ferrer
Shanghai 2008 Novak Djokovic Nikolay Davydenko
London 2009 Nikolay Davydenko Juan Martin del Potro
London 2010 Roger Federer (5) Rafael Nadal
London 2011 Roger Federer (6) Jo-Wilfried Tsonga
London 2012 Novak Djokovic (2) Roger Federer
London 2013 Novak Djokovic (3) Rafael Nadal
London 2014 Novak Djokovic (4) Roger Federer
London 2015 Novak Djokovic (5) Roger Federer
London 2016 Andy Murray Novak Djokovic
London 2017 Grigor Dimitrov David Goffin
London 2018 Alexander Zverev Novak Djokovic
London 2019 Stefanos Tsitsipas Dominic Thiem

*

ATP Finals tennis is live from London’s O2 Arena from 15-22 November 2020, with play starting at 12pm GMT. Bookmaker bet365 are offering customers the opportunity to watch a live stream of the matches alongside in-play betting.

Watch and bet on ATP tennis live at bet365 > live streaming > tennis (geo-restrictions apply; funded account required or to have placed a bet in the last 24 hours to qualify)

How to watch & bet on ATP tennis

1. Visit the bet365 website

2. Sign into your account or register for a new one

3. Select Live Streaming

4. Select ‘Tennis’ from the ‘All Sports’ drop down menu

5. Enjoy a live stream & in-play betting for ATP Finals tennis, live from London from 15-22 November 2020

PLEASE NOTE: You must have a funded account or have placed a bet in the last 24 hours in order to watch tennis; geo-restrictions apply.