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US Open

Latest US Open News

US Open 2020

You can’t stop the city that never sleeps: Despite the challenges of 2020, the biggest names in men’s and women’s tennis once again converged in New York for the US Open, live from 31 August-13 September.

Although the 2020 US Open lacked its unique atmosphere as it took place behind closed doors, the tennis wasn’t lacking anything.

Naomi Osaka won her second US Open title after defeating the resurgent Victoria Azarenka 1-6, 6-3, 6-3 in a thrilling final.

Naomi Osaka won her second US Open title (PA Images)

The men’s final will see Dominic Thiem facing off with Alexander Zverev to see who will be crowned the first new male Grand Slam champion in six years.

Read on below for information on how to stream all of the action live online!

US Open Live Streaming

US Open tennis is live from 31 August-13 September 2020 with play starting around 11am local/4pm BST. US Open night sessions begin at 7pm local/12am BST. Bookmaker bet365 are offering customers the opportunity to watch a live stream of the matches alongside in-play betting.

Watch and bet on US Open tennis live at bet365 > live streaming > tennis (geo-restrictions apply; funded account required or to have placed a bet in the last 24 hours to qualify)

How to watch & bet on US Open tennis

1. Visit the bet365 website

2. Sign into your account or register for a new one

3. Select Live Streaming

4. Select ‘Tennis’ from the ‘All Sports’ dropdown menu

5. Enjoy a live stream & in-play betting for US Open matches live from New York from 31 August-13 September 2020

PLEASE NOTE: You must have a funded account or have placed a bet in the last 24 hours in order to watch tennis; geo-restrictions apply.

US Open Order of Play: Sunday 13 September

Here is the full order of play for day fourteen at the 2020 US Open.

Arthur Ashe Stadium (play starts 12pm local/5pm BST)

Wheelchair women’s doubles final

Marjolein Buis (NED)/Diede de Groot (NED) (1) vs Yui Kamiji (JPN)/Jordanne Whiley (GBR) (2)

Not before 4pm local/9pm BST: Men’s singles final

Alexander Zverev (GER) (5) vs Dominic Thiem (AUT) (2)

Louis Armstrong Stadium (play starts 12pm local/5pm BST)

Wheelchair men’s singles final

Shingo Kuneida (JPN) vs Alfie Hewett (GBR)

Wheelchair quad singles final

Dylan Alcott (AUS) (1) vs Sam Schroder (NED)

US Open tournament schedule

US Open 2020

Date – Time Event Name Location
Monday 31 August 16:00 BST Men’s & women’s R1 matches Flushing Meadows
Tuesday 1 September 00:00 BST Men’s & women’s R1 matches Flushing Meadows
Tuesday 1 September 16:00 BST Men’s & women’s R1 matches Flushing Meadows
Wednesday 2 September 00:00 BST Men’s & women’s R1 matches Flushing Meadows
Wednesday 2 September 16:00 BST Men’s & women’s R2 matches Flushing Meadows
Thursday 3 September 00:00 BST Men’s & women’s R2 matches Flushing Meadows
Thursday 3 September 16:00 BST Men’s & women’s R2 matches Flushing Meadows
Friday 4 September 00:00 BST Men’s & women’s R2 matches Flushing Meadows
Friday 4 September 16:00 BST Men’s & women’s R3 matches Flushing Meadows
Saturday 5 September 00:00 BST Men’s & women’s R3 matches Flushing Meadows
Saturday 5 September 16:00 BST Men’s & women’s R3 matches Flushing Meadows
Sunday 6 September 00:00 BST Men’s & women’s R3 matches Roland Garros
Sunday 6 September 16:00 BST Men’s & women’s R16 matches Roland Garros
Monday 7 September 00:00 BST Men’s & women’s R16 matches Flushing Meadows
Monday 7 September 16:00 BST Men’s & women’s R16 matches Flushing Meadows
Tuesday 8 September 00:00 BST Men’s & women’s R16 matches Flushing Meadows
Tuesday 8 September 16:00 BST Men’s & women’s QFs Flushing Meadows
Wednesday 9 September 00:00 BST Men’s & women’s QFs Flushing Meadows
Wednesday 9 September 16:00 BST Men’s & women’s QFs Flushing Meadows
Thursday 10 September 00:00 BST Men’s & women’s QFs Flushing Meadows
Friday 11 September 00:00 BST Women’s SFs Flushing Meadows
Friday 11 September 21:00 BST Men’s SFs Flushing Meadows
Saturday 12 September 21:00 BST Women’s final Flushing Meadows
Sunday 13 September 21:00 BST Men’s final Flushing Meadows

US Open 2020 Seeds & Results

US Open Men’s Seeds

Seed Player Ranking Best USO result Latest result
1 Novak Djokovic 1 Champion (2011, 2015, 2018) R1: d. Damir Dzumhur, 6-1, 6-4, 6-1
R2: d. Kyle Edmund, 6-7(5), 6-3, 6-4, 6-2
R3: d. Jan-Lennard Struff (28), 6-3, 6-3, 6-1
R16: Lost to Pablo Carreno Busta (20), 5-6 (def.)
2 Dominic Thiem 3 QF (2018) R1: d. Jaume Munar, 7-6(6), 6-3 (ret.)
R2: d. Sumit Nagal, 6-3, 6-3, 6-2
R3: d. Marin Cilic (31), 6-2, 6-2, 3-6, 6-3
R16: d. Felix Auger-Aliassime (15), 7-6(4), 6-1, 6-1
QF: d. Alex de Minaur (21), 6-1, 6-2, 6-4
SF: D. Daniil Medvedev (3), 6-2, 7-6(7), 7-6(5)
F: Faces Alexander Zverev (5)
3 Daniil Medvedev 5 Runner-up (2019) R1: d. Federico Delbonis, 6-1, 6-2, 6-4
R2: d. Christopher O’Connell, 6-3, 6-2, 6-4
R3: d. J.J. Wolf, 6-3, 6-3, 6-2
R16: d. Frances Tiafoe, 6-4, 6-1, 6-0
QF: d. Andrey Rublev (10), 7-6(6), 6-3, 7-6(5)
SF: Lost to Dominic Thiem (3), 2-6, 6-7(7), 6-7(5)
4 Stefanos Tsitsipas 6 R2 (2018) R1: d. Albert Ramos-Vinolas, 6-2, 6-1, 6-1
R2: d. Maxime Cressy, 7-6(2), 6-3, 6-4
R3: Lost to Borna Coric (27), 7-6(2), 4-6, 6-4, 5-7, 6-7(4)
5 Alexander Zverev 7 R16 (2019) R1: d. Kevin Anderson, 7-6(2), 5-7, 6-3, 7-5
R2: d. Brandon Nakashima, 7-5, 6-7(8), 6-3, 6-1
R3: d. Adrian Mannarino (32), 6-7(4), 6-4, 6-2, 6-2
R16: d. Alejandro Davidovich Fokina, 6-2, 6-2, 6-1
QF: d. Borna Coric (27), 1-6, 7-6(5), 7-6(1), 6-3
SF: d. Pablo Carreno Busta (20), 3-6, 2-6, 6-3, 6-4, 6-3
F: Faces Dominic Thiem (2)
6 Matteo Berrettini 8 SF (2019) R1: d. Go Soeda, 7-6(5), 6-1, 6-4
R2: d. Ugo Humbert, 6-4, 6-4, 7-6(6)
R3: d. Casper Ruud (30), 6-4, 6-4, 6-2
R16: Lost to Andrey Rublev (10), 6-4, 3-6, 3-6, 3-6
7 David Goffin 10 R16 (2017-19) R1: d. Reilly Opelka, 7-6(2), 3-6, 6-1, 6-4
R2: d. Lloyd Harris, 7-6(6), 4-6, 6-1, 6-4
R3: d. Filip Krajinovic (26), 6-1, 7-6(5), 6-4
R16: Lost to Denis Shapovalov (12), 7-6(0), 3-6, 4-6, 3-6
8 Roberto Bautista Agut 12 R16 (2014-15) R1: d. Tennys Sandgren, 6-4, 6-4, 7-6(3)
R2: d. Miomir Kecmanovic, 6-3, 3-6, 6-3, 6-4
R3: Lost to Vasek Pospisil, 5-7, 6-2, 6-4, 3-6, 2-6
R16: Lost to Alex de Minaur (21), 4-6, 6-0, 6-4, 3-6, 1-6
9 Diego Schwartzman 13 QF (2017, 2019) R1: Lost to Cameron Norrie, 6-3, 6-4, 2-6, 1-6, 5-7
10 Andrey Rublev 14 QF (2017) R1: d. Jeremy Chardy, 6-4, 6-4, 6-3
R2: d. Gregoire Barrere, 6-2, 6-4, 7-6(4)
R3: d. Salvatore Caruso, 6-0, 6-4, 6-0
R16: d. Matteo Berrettini (6), 4-6, 6-3, 6-3, 6-3
QF: Lost to Daniil Medvedev (3), 6-7(6), 3-6, 6-7(5)
11 Karen Khachanov 16 R3 (2018) R1: d. Jannik Sinner, 3-6, 6-7(7), 6-2, 6-0, 7-6(4)
R2: d. Andrey Kuznetsov, 6-3, 6-4, 6-1
R3: Lost to Alex de Minaur (21), 6-4, 0-6, 4-6, 6-3, 6-1
12 Denis Shapovalov 17 R16 (2017) R1: d. Sebastian Korda (WC), 6-4, 4-6, 6-3, 6-2
R2: d. Soonwoo Kwon, 6-7(5), 6-4, 6-4, 6-2
R3: d. Taylor Fritz (19), 3-6, 6-3, 4-6, 7-6(5), 6-2
R16: d. David Goffin (7), 6-7(0), 6-3, 6-4, 6-3
QF: Lost to Pablo Carreno Busta (20), 6-3, 6-7(5), 6-7(4), 6-0, 3-6
13 Cristian Garin 18 R2 (2019) R1: d. Ulises Blanch, 4-7, 5-7, 6-4, 6-4, 6-2
R2: Lost to Mikhail Kuksuhkin, 2-6, 1-6, 6-3, 6-4, 5-7
14 Grigor Dimitrov 19 SF (2019) R1: d. Tommy Paul, 6-4, 6-3, 6-1
R2: Lost to Marton Fucsovics, 7-6(5), 6-7(4), 6-3, 4-6, 1-6
15 Felix Auger-Aliassime 20 R1 (2018-19) R1: d. Thiago Monteiro, 6-3, 6-7(7), 7-6(6), 7-6(6)
R2: d. Andy Murray, 6-2, 6-3, 6-4
R3: d. Corentin Moutet, 6-1, 6-0, 6-4
R16: Lost to Dominic Thiem (2), 6-7(4), 1-6, 1-6
16 John Isner 21 QF (2011, 2018) R1: Lost to Steve Johnson, 7-6(5), 3-6, 7-6(5), 3-6, 5-7
17 Benoit Paire 22 R16 (2015) Withdrew
18 Dusan Lajovic 23 R3 (2018) R1: Lost to Egor Gerasimov, 1-6, 6-4, 4-6, 4-6
19 Taylor Fritz 24 R3 (2018) R1: d. Dominik Koepfer, 6-7(7), 6-2, 6-3, 6-4
R2: d. Gilles Simon, 7-5, 6-3, 6-2
R3: Lost to Denis Shapovalov (12), 6-3, 3-6, 6-4, 6-7(5), 2-6
20 Pablo Carreno Busta 25 SF (2017) R1: d. Yasutaka Uchiyama, 4-6, 6-3, 1-6, 6-4, 6-3
R2: d. Mitchell Krueger, 6-1, 6-2, 6-2
R3: d. Ricardas Berankis, 6-4, 6-3, 6-2
R16: d. Novak Djokovic (1), 6-5 (def.)
QF: d. Denis Shapovalov (12), 3-6, 7-6(5), 7-6(4), 0-6, 6-3
SF: Lost to Alexander Zverev (5), 6-3, 6-2, 3-6, 4-6, 3-6
21 Alex de Minaur 26 R16 (2019) R1: d. Andrej Martin, 6-4, 6-3, 7-5
R2: d. Richard Gasquet, 6-4, 6-3, 6-7(6), 7-5
R3: d. Karen Khachanov (11), 6-4, 0-6, 4-6, 6-3, 6-1
R16: d. Vasek Pospisil, 7-6(6), 6-3, 6-2
QF: Lost to Dominic Thiem (2), 1-6, 2-6, 4-6
22 Nikoloz Basilashvili 27 R16 (2018) R1: Lost to John Millman, 1-6, 4-6, 4-6
23 Dan Evans 28 R3 (2013, 2016, 2019) R1: d. Thiago Seyboth Wild, 6-2, 6-1, 7-6(5)
R2: Lost to Corentin Moutet, 6-4, 3-6, 6-7(5), 6-7(1)
24 Hubert Hurkacz 29 R2 (2018) R1: d. Peter Gojowczyk, 6-3, 6-4, 6-4
R2: Lost to Alejandro Davidovich Fokina, 4-6, 6-1, 2-6, 2-6
25 Milos Raonic 30 R16 (2012-14, 2018) R1: d. Leonardo Mayer, 6-3, 6-2, 6-2
R2: Lost to Vasek Pospisil, 7-6(1), 3-6, 6-7(4), 3-6
26 Filip Krajinovic 32 R2 (2015) R1: d. Mikael Ymer, 6-2, 7-6(3), 6-3
R2: d. Marcos Giron, 6-4, 6-1, 6-3
R3: Lost to David Goffin (7), 1-6, 6-7(5), 4-6
27 Borna Coric 33 R16 (2018) R1: d. Pablo Andujar, 7-5, 6-3, 6-1
R2: d. Juan Ignacio Londero, 7-5, 4-6, 6-7(5), 6-2, 6-3
R3: d. Stefanos Tsitsipas (4), 6-7(2), 6-4, 4-6, 7-5, 7-6(4)
R16: d. Jordan Thompson, 7-5, 6-1, 6-3
QF: Lost to Alexander Zverev (5), 6-1, 6-7(5), 6-7(1), 3-6
28 Jan-Lennard Struff 34 R3 (2018) R1: d. Pedro Martinez, 6-0, 7-5, 6-4
R2: d. Michael Mmoh, 6-2, 6-2, 7-5
R3: Lost to Novak Djokovic (1), 3-6, 3-6, 1-6
29 Guido Pella 35 R3 (2018) R1: Lost to J. J. Wolf, 2-6, 6-0, 3-6, 3-6
30 Casper Ruud 36 R1 (2018-19) R1: d. Mackenzie Macdonald, 4-6, 4-6, 6-4, 6-3, 6-2
R2: d. Emil Ruusuvuori, 6-4, 6-3, 3-2 (ret.)
R3: Lost to Matteo Berrettini (6), 4-6, 4-6, 2-6
31 Marin Cilic 37 Champion (2014) R1: d. Denis Kudla, 6-7(3), 3-6, 7-5, 7-5, 6-3
R2: d. Norbert Gombos, 6-3, 1-6, 7-6(2), 7-5
R3: Lost to Dominic Thiem (2), 2-6, 2-6, 6-3, 3-6
32 Adrian Mannarino 38 R3 (2013-14, 2017) R1: d. Lorenzo Sonego, 6-1, 6-4, 2-6, 6-3
R2: d. Jack Sock, 7-6(5), 7-5, 6-2
R3: Lost to Alexander Zverev (5), 7-6(4), 4-6, 2-6, 2-6

US Open Women’s Seeds

Seed Player Ranking Best USO result Latest result
1 Karolina Pliskova 3 Runner-up (2016) R1: d. Anhelina Kalinina, 6-4, 6-0
R2: Lost to Caroline Garcia, 1-6, 6-7(2)
2 Sofia Kenin 4 R3 (2017-19) R1: d. Yanina Wickmayer, 6-2, 6-2
R2: d. Leylah Annie Fernandez, 6-4, 6-3
R3: d. Ons Jabeur (27), 7-6(4), 6-3
R16: Lost to Elise Mertens (16), 3-6, 3-6
3 Serena Williams 9 Champion (1999, 2001, 2008, 2012-14) R1: d. Kristie Ahn, 7-5, 6-3
R2: d. Margarita Gasparyan, 6-2, 6-4
R3: d. Sloane Stephens (26), 2-6, 6-2, 6-2
R16: d. Maria Sakkari (15), 6-3, 6-7(6), 6-3
QF: d. Tsvetana Pironkova, 4-6, 6-3, 6-2
SF: Lost to Victoria Azarenka, 6-1, 3-6, 3-6
4 Naomi Osaka 10 Champion (2018) 1: d. Misaki Doi, 6-2, 5-7, 6-2
R2: d. Camila Giorgi, 6-1, 6-2
R3: d. Marta Kostyuk, 6-3, 6-7(4), 6-2
R16: d. Anett Kontaveit (14), 6-3, 6-4
QF: d. Shelby Rogers, 6-3, 6-4
SF: d. Jennifer Brady (28), 7-6(1), 3-6, 6-3
F: d. Victoria Azarenka, 1-6, 6-3, 6-3
5 Aryna Sabalenka 11 R16 (2018) R1: d. Oceane Dodin, 7-6(1), 6-4
R2: Lost to Victoria Azarenka, 1-6, 3-6
6 Petra Kvitova 12 QF (2015, 2017) R1: d. Irina-Camelia Begu, 6-3, 6-2
R2: d. Kateryna Kozlova, 7-6(3), 6-2
R3: d. Jessica Pegula, 6-4, 6-3
R16: Lost to Shelby Rogers, 6-7(5), 6-3, 6-7(6)
7 Madison Keys 13 Runner-up (2017) R1: d. Timea Babos, 6-1, 6-1
R2: d. Aliona Bolsova, 6-2, 6-1
R3: Lost to Alize Cornet, 6-7(4), 2-3 (ret.)
8 Petra Martic 14 R16 (2019) R1: d. Tereza Martincova, 5-7, 6-2, 6-4
R2: d. Kateryna Bondarenko, 6-3, 6-4
R3: d. Varvara Gracheva, 6-3, 6-3
R16: Lost to Yulia Putintseva (23), 6-3, 2-6, 6-4
9 Johanna Konta 15 QF (2019) R1: d. Heather Watson, 7-6(7), 6-1
R2: Lost to Sorana Cirstea, 6-2, 6-7(5), 4-6
10 Garbine Muguruza 16 R16 (2017) R1: d. Nao Hibino, 6-4, 6-4
R2: Lost to Tsvetana Pironkova, 5-7, 3-6
11 Elena Rybakina 17 R1 (2019) R1: d. Katarina Zavatska, 6-3, 6-0
R2: Lost to Shelby Rogers, 5-7, 1-6
12 Marketa Vondrousova 18 R16 (2018) R1: d. Greet Minnen, 6-1, 6-4
R2: Lost to Aliaksandra Sasnovich, 1-6, 2-6
13 Alison Riske 19 R16 (2013) R1: d. Tatjana Maria, 6-3, 6-2
R2: Lost to Ann Li, 0-6, 3-6
14 Anett Kontaveit 20 R16 (2015) R1: d. Danielle Collins, 5-7, 6-2, 6-2
R2: d. Kaja Juvan, 6-4, 6-1
R3: d. Magda Linette (24), 6-3, 6-2
R16: Lost to Naomi Osaka (4), 3-6, 4-6
15 Maria Sakkari 21 R3 (2017, 2019) R1: d. Stefanie Voegele, 6-3, 3-6, 7-5
R2: d. Bernarda Pera, 2-6, 6-3, 6-2
R3: d. Amanda Anisimova (22), 6-3, 6-1
R16: Lost to Serena Williams (3), 3-6, 7-6(3), 3-6
16 Elise Mertens 22 QF (2019) R1: d. Laura Siegemund, 6-2, 6-2
R2: d. Sara Sorribes Tormo, 6-3, 7-5
R3: d. Caty McNally, 7-5, 6-1
R16: d. Sofia Kenin (2), 6-3, 6-3
QF: Lost to Victoria Azarenka, 1-6, 0-6
17 Angelique Kerber 23 Champion (2016) R1: d. Ajla Tomljanovic, 6-4, 6-4
R2: d. Anna-Lena Friedsam, 6-3, 7-6(6)
R3: d. Ann Li, 6-3, 6-4
R16: Lost to Jennifer Brady (28), 1-6, 4-6
18 Donna Vekic 24 QF (2019) R1: d. Kristyna Pliskova, 3-6, 7-6(6), 6-4
R2: d. Patricia Maria Tig, 6-2, 6-1
R3: Lost to Tsvetana Pironkova, 4-6, 1-6
19 Dayana Yastremska 25 R3 (2019) R1: d. Astra Sharma, 6-3, 6-7(4), 7-6(2)
R2: Lost to Madison Brengle, 2-6, 3-6
20 Karolina Muchova 26 R3 (2018-19) R1: d. Venus Williams, 6-3, 7-5
R2: d. Anna Kalinskaya, 6-3, 7-6(4)
R3: d. Sorana Cirstea, 6-3, 2-6, 7-6(7)
R16: Lost to Victoria Azarenka, 7-5, 1-6, 4-6
21 Ekaterina Alexandrova 27 R2 (2017, 2019) R1: d. Kim Clijsters, 3-6, 7-5, 6-1
R2: Lost to Caty McNally, 6-4, 3-6, 6-7(2)
22 Amanda Anisimova 28 R1 (2018) R1: d. Viktoriya Tomova, 7-5, 7-5
R2: d. Katrina Scott, 4-6, 6-4, 6-1
R3: Lost to Maria Sakkari (15), 3-6, 1-6
23 Yulia Putintseva 33 R3 (2019) R1: d. Robin Montgomery, 6-1, 6-3
R2: d. Vera Lapko, 6-3, 6-3
R3: d. Aliaksandra Sasnovich, 3-6, 6-2, 6-1
R16: d. Petra Martic (8), 6-3, 2-6, 6-4
QF: Lost to Jennifer Brady (28), 3-6, 2-6
24 Magda Linette 35 R2 (2015, 2019) R1: d. Madison Inglis, 6-1, 4-6, 6-4
R2: d. Danka Kovinic, 6-1, 6-7(2), 7-6(4)
R3: Lost to Anett Kontaveit (14), 3-6, 2-6
25 Zhang Shuai 36 R3 (2016-17, 2019) R1: Lost to Ysaline Bonaventure, 6-4, 3-6, 2-6
26 Sloane Stephens 37 Champion (2017) R1: d. Mihaela Buzarnescu, 6-3, 6-3
R2: d. Olga Govortosva, 6-2, 6-2
R3: Lost to Serena Williams (3), 6-2, 2-6, 2-6
27 Ons Jabeur 39 R3 (2019) R1: d. Katarzyna Kawa, 6-2, 7-6(6)
R2: d. Kaia Kanepi, 7-6(8), 6-0
R3: Lost to Sofia Kenin (2), 6-7(4), 3-6
28 Jennifer Brady 40 R16 (2017) R1: d. Anna Blinkova, 6-2, 6-3
R2: d. Cici Bellis, 6-1, 6-2
R3: d. Caroline Garcia, 6-3, 6-3
R16: d. Angelique Kerber (17), 6-1, 6-4
QF: d. Yulia Putintseva (23), 6-3, 6-2
SF: Lost to Naomi Osaka (4), 6-7(1), 6-3, 3-6
29 Veronika Kudermetova 41 R1 (2019) R1: Lost to Iga Swiatek, 3-6, 3-6
30 Kristina Mladenovic 43 QF (2015) R1: d. Hailey Baptiste, 7-5, 6-2
R2: Lost to Varvara Gracheva, 6-1, 6-7(2), 0-6
31 Anastasija Sevastova 44 SF (2018) R1: d. Coco Gauff, 6-3, 5-7, 6-4
R2: Lost to Marta Kostyuk, 3-6, 6-7(5)
32 Rebecca Peterson 46 R3 (2018) R1: Lost to Kirsten Flipkens, 6-7(1), 4-6

US Open 2020 players

As one of tennis’s four biggest tournaments, offering 2,000 ranking points and prize money of $3,850,000 to each of the men’s and women’s singles champions, the US Open is usually guaranteed to attract the biggest stars in the game.

The entry list for the 2020 edition will be a denuded one, with Roger Federer, world no. 1 Ashleigh Barty, Nick Kyrgios and defending champion Rafael Nadal among those who will not be attending.

But some of the most exciting stars in the sport are still scheduled to be in the field when the 2020 US Open begins on Monday 31 August – here’s the lowdown on some of the biggest names.

Novak Djokovic leads the US Open field as he looks for his fourth title in 2020 (PA Images)

Novak Djokovic

A three-time U.S. Open champion, Djokovic remains in a three-way tussle with Nadal and Federer for the most Grand Slam titles in history – and the Serbian will be as determined as ever to close that gap in New York this year after he was forced to withdraw from the 2019 tournament with injury.

Djokovic started 2020 in exemplary style, going 18-0 through the first two months of the season as he won the ATP Cup with Serbia, claimed a record eighth Australian Open title and defeated Stefanos Tsitsipas in the final to win the Dubai Duty Free Tennis Championships for the fifth time.

Serena Williams is a six-time champion at the US Open and has been in the final the past two years (Photo credit: Sergei’ Vishnevskii’/Kommersant/Sipa USA)

Serena Williams

Six-time US Open champion Serena Williams is still looking for her first major win since returning from maternity leave – but with four Grand Slam finals reached throughout 2018 and 2019, surely she is closing in. The legendary American suffered another heartbreaking defeat in last year’s U.S. Open final to Andreescu – can Serena bounce back for another shot at the title in New York in 2020?

Williams made her return to competition at the Top Seed Open in Lexington last week, where despite a quarterfinal defeat to Shelby Rogers she defeated sister Venus in a three-set thriller which has raised expectations for her US Open campaign sky-high.

Dominic Thiem

Two-time French Open finalist Thiem has done more than any other player to make himself look like a credible candidate to become men’s tennis’s only active major winner under the age of 30 – and he’s no one-surface specialist despite his clay prowess, with his first Masters 1000 Series title coming on the hard courts of Indian Wells in 2019, along with making the final of the ATP Finals in London and the Australian Open final in Melbourne in January 2020.

Thiem has even kept himself busy during the suspension of the sport, playing a high number of exhibition events.

Naomi Osaka

Osaka shot to fame at the 2018 US Open when she dropped just one set on her way to her maiden Grand Slam title, defeating the legendary Serena Williams in the final. Since then, she’s won the Australian Open and risen to world no. 1.

Currently ranked world no. 10, Osaka will warm up for the US Open at the Western & Southern Open and should be one of the main contenders for the title in New York.

Alexander Zverev

Germany’s Zverev, the most accomplished player of his generation, went through a bit of a slump in 2019 as he struggled with issues on court and off but he is a three-time Masters 1000 Series champion as well as a former ATP Finals champion – can he make his Grand Slam breakthrough in New York?

Zverev will have a new member of his coaching team when he takes part in the US Open in 2020 – retired world no. 2 David Ferrer.

Karolina Pliskova

World no. 3 Pliskova looks likely to be the top seed at the US Open, and the big-serving Czech would in any case be a force to be reckoned with at Flushing Meadows.

Pliskova defeated both Williams sisters to reach her maiden major final at the US Open in 2016, finishing runner-up to Angelique Kerber, and was a quarterfinalist in 2017-18 as well.

The ‘ace queen’ won the 16th WTA Tour title of her career in Brisbane in January and will warm up at the Western & Southern Open before challenging for the US Open title.

Daniil Medvedev

Medvedev was arguably the biggest story in men’s tennis in 2019 and a large part of that was due to his extraordinary summer in North America last year, where he won the Cincinnati Masters and reached finals in Washington, Canada of course the U.S. Open, where he played both the villain and hero during an incredible run to his first major final, coming within a whisker of beating Nadal in what was a five-set epic.

Having stayed quiet during the suspension of the sport, Medvedev should be ready and raring to go for the 2020 US Open.

Sofia Kenin

Just 21 years old, the USA’s Sofia Kenin claimed her maiden major title in January when she defeated Barty and Garbine Muguruza to win the Australian Open, and picked up a second title for the season in Lyon in February.

Kenin made her US Ope main-draw debut in 2015 and won back-to-back matches in 2017-19. In each case, it took a top player to stop her – and she should be seeded second in 2020, making her an even more formidable prospect in New York.

When is the 2020 US Open?

Due to health concerns, there will be no qualifying tournament at the 2020 US Open.

Main-draw play at the 2020 US Open begins on Monday August 31 with first-round men’s and women’s singles matches and concludes on Sunday 13 September with the men’s singles final.

About the 2020 US Open

The US Open is usually the last of four Grand Slams on the tennis calendar, starting on the last Monday in August, and running for two weeks. The tournament is one of two majors staged on hard courts, the other being the Australian Open, while the other two are played on clay (Roland Garros) and grass courts (Wimbledon).

Staged at the magnificent USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Centre, the US Open boasts arguably the most electric atmosphere of the four majors, and it’s renowned for its game-changing innovations and lead role in moving the sport forward. The US Open became the first major to award equal prize money to men and women in 1973, while it was also the first to employ floodlights to enable night-time play. Amongst other distinct features of the tournament, it was the first to use tie breaks to decide sets; and till this day, remains the only major to employ breakers in deciding sets. The US Open is also the only Slam that has been staged every year since its inception in 1881 – a record it will maintain in 2020 despite the challenges of an unprecedented global pandemic, with a streamlined event to be played behind closed doors and adhering to strict safety protocols.

William Larned, Richard Sears and Bill Tilden lead the all-time list of US Open champions with seven titles, while Roger Federer is among three players who share the Open Era record of five titles. Novak Djokovic has won three U.S. Opens, while defending champion Rafael Nadal could join Federer and co. on five if he can go back-to-back at Flushing Meadows in 2020.

US Open History

The US Open started off as a grass-court tournament in Newport, Rhode Island in August 1881, with American, Richard Sears winning the inaugural edition (he won the first seven editions!). Then known as the US National Singles Championships for Men, the tournament employed a challenge system between 1884 and 1911, with the reigning champion qualifying directly for the final, where he will take on the winner from an All-Comers tournament in a challenge round. A women’s national championships – the US Women’s National Singles Championship – began at the Philadelphia Cricket Club in 1887, with 17-year-old Ellen Hansell claiming the first title. The women’s championship initially adopted the same format as the men’s, with the All-Comers champion facing the defending champion in a challenge round.

The challenge format was stopped in 1912 for the men’s championship, and in 1919 for the women’s.

Following protests by a select group of players, who argued that the US National Championships should be moved to New York because most clubs, players and fans were based in the New York City area, the tournament moved from Newport to New York in 1915, where it was staged at the West Side Tennis Club in Forest Hills. There was a brief period between 1921 and 1923 when the championships were held at the Germantown Cricket Club to allow for construction works at the new Forest Hills Stadium. Upon completion of the 14000-seater stadium, the US National Championships relocated again in 1924- the same year it was recognized as a major tournament by the International Lawn Tennis Federation, ILTF.

Like the other majors, the US Championships became open to professional players in 1968, as the Open Era began. Still staged at Forest Hills, 96 men and 63 women competed for an overall prize money of $100,000. Interestingly, men’s champion, Arthur Ashe was still registered as an amateur back then, hence was not eligible for the $14000 winner’s prize, which was instead awarded to finalist, Tom Okker! The US Open became the first major to award equal prize money to men and women, with John Newcombe and Margaret Court both receiving $25000 for being champions in 1973.

The tournament also became the first major to use tie breaks to decide sets in 1970, and till today, remains the only Grand Slam to employ a final-set tie break. The US Open, in 1975, pioneered the use of floodlights for night-time play, while in 2006, it became the first Grand Slam to employ the Hawk-Eye technology to challenge debatable line calls.

The US Open eventually switched from Forest Hills to its current location- the USTA National Tennis Centre at Flushing Meadows in 1978. The two centres aren’t too far from each other, with only three miles separating them. The current venue was renamed the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Centre in 2006, in honour of four-time champion, Billie Jean King. The Centre holds a total of 22 courts, including the magnificent 22,547-seater main show court, the Arthur Ashe Stadium.

Through the years, the US Open has been staged on three different surfaces- grass, clay and hard courts. It was held on grass between 1881 and 1974, while it was played on clay in the final three years at Forest Hills between 1975 and 1977. With the switch to the US National Tennis Centre in 1978, the final Grand Slam of the year moved to hard courts. The US Open courts were initially coloured green, but from 2005, the courts adopted blue colour to aid television viewing. Jimmy Connors is the only man to have won the men’s singles title on all three surfaces, while Chris Evert was women’s champion on clay and hard courts. No woman won the title on grass, clay and hard courts.

Richard Sears, Bill Larned, and Bill Tilden hold the record for the most successful US Open campaigners, with their seven titles, all of which were won before the Open Era, while Roger Federer, Pete Sampras and Jimmy Connors share the Open Era record at 5 titles.

The most successful woman in the tournament’s history is eight-time champion, Molla Bjurstedt Mallory; Helen Wills Moody has seven titles, while Serena Williams and Chris Evert have the Open Era record at six.

What is the US Open Series?

The US Open series is a five-week series of tournaments on North American hard courts, which culminates at the US Open in New York.

First started in 2004 so as to enhance television coverage of tennis in the United States, the Series has gone on to crown many great champions, including Serena Williams and Roger Federer. Along with the US Open, the US Open series currently includes tournaments in Atlanta, Montreal/Toronto, Cincinnati and Winston-Salem for the men, while the women battle for US Open Series points in San Jose, Montreal/Toronto, Cincinnati and New Haven.

Points are awarded to players depending on how far they go in these tournaments, with the top three points scorers in each tour earning extra prize money in the US Open Series Bonus Challenge. The amount earned is dependent on their eventual performance at the US Open. Players who win both the US Open Series and the US Open are entitled to the maximum amount of prize money, which has been increasing through the years. (The 2017 US Open series did not include a Bonus Challenge).

Kim Clijsters became the first player to win both the US Open and the US Open Series back in 2005, earning a cumulative $2.2million, which at the time, was the biggest payout in women’s sports, while Roger Federer, in 2007, was the first man to win the Series and the US Open in the same year, earning $2.4million for his efforts – including a $1million bonus for winning the US Open series. With the overall prize money constantly increasing, those figures have since been usurped by Serena Williams, who carted away $4million dollars in 2014 in what was the largest payout in tennis history, male or female, before Ashleigh Barty’s victory at the 2019 WTA Finals Shenzhen.

The US Open Series in 2020 has been severely curtailed by the global health crisis, but there will be warm-up events before the US Open begins on 31 August: Jennifer Brady won the title at the Top Seed Open in Lexington, Kentucky where the field included Serena Williams and Coco Gauff; and the Western & Southern Open, relocated from Cincinnati to New York, takes place from 22-28 August.

Who are the greatest US Open champions?

American Richard Sears was the first true great of the US Open, winning the first seven editions of the tournament. Sears handed the baton to William Larned, who dominated the US Championships in the early twentieth century, winning his own seven titles between 1901 and 1911, non-consecutively of course. The only other man to possess seven titles is Bill Tilden, who dominated the event in the 1920s. He won six straight titles between 1920 and 1925; and added one more in 1929.

Each of Sears, Larned and Tilden won the tournament at least five consecutive times, a feat only matched by Roger Federer in the Open Era. Federer won his five US Open titles in a row, dominating the final Grand Slam of the year between 2004 and 2008. He looked set to make it six in a row when he led Juan Martin del Potro by two sets to one in the 2009 final, but the big Argentine with the mighty forehand fought back impressively to create a massive Grand Slam upset at Flushing Meadows.

Federer’s five consecutive titles is an Open Era record, but the great Swiss isn’t the only man with five titles- Pete Sampras, who won his titles between 1999 and 2002, and Jimmy Connors also have five. John McEnroe has four, a mark he shares with compatriot, and pre-1990’s champion, Robert Wrenn, while four-time winner Rafael Nadal and three-time champions Ivan Lendl and Novak Djokovic are the only other men in the Open Era with more than two titles.

There are a host of players on two US Open titles, including Rod Laver, Ken Rosewall, Patrick Rafter, John Newcombe, Rene Lacoste, Andre Agassi, Roy Emerson and Stefan Edberg.

In the women’s field, Molla Bjurstedt Mallory leads the way with eight titles, while Helen Wills Moody is one behind in second place. Unsurprisingly, Serena Williams is atop the Open Era list with her six US Open titles, a record she shares with Chris Evert. Steffi Graff and Margaret Court have five titles each, (two of Court’s successes came before the Open Era), while Billie Jean King and Martina Navratilova are among those on four titles. Evert is the only woman in the Open Era to have won four straight crowns- a feat she achieved between 1975 and 1978.

Special mentions also go to modern-day greats Venus Williams, Kim Clijsters, Justin Henin and Monica Seles, all of whom are two-time US Open champions.

US Open records

Most titles (men)
Before 1968 – Three players won seven men’s singles titles at the US Open: Richard Sears (1881-87), Bill Larned (1901-11) and Bill Tilden (1920-9)
Open Era – Three players have each won five men’s singles titles at the US Open: Jimmy Connors (1974-1983), Pete Sampras (1990-2002) and Roger Federer (2004-8)

Most titles (women)
Before 1968 – Molla Bjurstedt Mallory won eight women’s singles titles between 1915 and 1926
Open Era – Both Chris Evert (1975-82) and Serena Williams (1999-2014) have won six women’s singles titles

Most consecutive titles (men)
Before 1968 – Richard Sears won seven straight titles from 1881 to 1887
Open Era – Roger Federer won five straight titles from 2004 to 2008

Most consecutive titles (women)
Before 1968 – Both Molla Bjurstedt Mallory (1915-18) and Helen Jacobs (1932-5) won four straight titles
Open Era – Chris Evert won four straight titles from 1975-8

Most singles finals (men)
Bill Tilden appeared in 10 US Open men’s singles finals between 1918 and 1929
The Open Era record is held by Pete Sampras, who appeared in eight US Open men’s singles finals between 1990 and 2002

Most singles finals (women)
Molla Bjurstedt Mallory appeared in 10 US Open women’s singles finals between 1915 and 1926
The Open Era record is held by Chris Evert, who appeared in nine US Open women’s singles finals between 1975 and 1984

Youngest winner (men)
Pete Sampras won the title in 1990 aged 19 years and 1 month

Youngest winner (women)
Tracy Austin won the title in 1979 aged 16 years and 8 months

Oldest winner (men)
William Larned won the title in 1911 aged 38 years and 8 months

Oldest winner (women)
Molla Bjurstedt Mallory won the title in 1926 aged 42 years and 5 months

Most singles tournaments played (men)
All-time – Vic Seixas Jr. played in 28 US Opens between 1940 and 1969
Open Era – Jimmy Connors played in 22 US Opens between 1970 and 1992

Most singles tournaments played (women)
Martina Navratilova played in 21 US Opens between 1973 and 1993

Most singles matches won (men)
Jimmy Connors won 98 singles matches between 1970 and 1992

Most singles matches won (women)
Chris Evert won 101 singles matches between 1971 and 1989

Most aces in a tournament since 1991 (men)
Pete Sampras served 144 aces on his way to the title in 2002

Most aces in a tournament since 1991 (women)
Serena Williams served 70 aces on her way to the title in 1999

Most aces in a match since 1991 (men)
Ivo Karlovic served 61 aces in a first-round win against Yen-Hsun Lu in 2016

Most aces in a match since 1991 (women)
Serena Williams and Venus Williams are tied for this record, with both having served 18 aces in a single US Open match: Serena in a three-set defeat of Simona Halep in the 2016 quarterfinals and Venus in a three-set defeat of Monica Puig in the first round in 2015

Longest match (men)
By time – Stefan Edberg d. Michael Chang (1992, semifinals), 6-7(3), 7-5, 7-6(3), 5-7, 6-4 in five hours and 26 minutes

By games (with tie break scoring) – John Lloyd d. Paul McNamee (1979, R2), 5-7, 6-7, 7-5, 7-6, 7-6 (63 games)

In a final – There is a tie between Mats Wilander’s 1988 victory over Ivan Lendl 6-4, 4-6, 6-3, 5-7, 6-4, and Andy Murray’s 2012 7-6(10), 7-5, 2-6, 3-6, 6-2 victory over Novak Djokovic: Both matches took four hours and 54 minutes

Longest match (women)

By time – Shelby Rogers d. Daria Gavrilova (2017, R1), 7-6(6), 4-6, 7-6(5) in three hours and 33 minutes.

US Open Champions

Here is a complete list of all the men’s and women’s singles champions during the Open Era.

Former US Open champions (Open Era)

Year Men’s Champion Men’s Runner-up Women’s Champion Women’s Runner-up
1968 Arthur Ashe Tom Okker Virginia Wade Billie Jean King
1969 Rod Laver (2) Tony Roche Margaret Court (3) Nancy Richey
1970 Ken Rosewall Tony Roche Margaret Court (4) Rosemary Casals
1971 Stan Smith Jan Kodes Billie Jean King (2) Rosemary Casals
1972 Ilie Nastase Arthur Ashe Billie Jean King (3) Kerry Melville Reid
1973 John Newcombe Jan Kodes Margaret Court (5) Evonne Goolagong Cawley
1974 Jimmy Connors Ken Rosewall Billie Jean King (4) Evonne Goolagong Cawley
1975 Manuel Orantes Jimmy Connors Chris Evert Evonne Goolagong Cawley
1976 Jimmy Connors (2) Bjorn Borg Chris Evert (2) Evonne Goolagong Cawley
1977 Guillermo Vilas Jimmy Connors Chris Evert (3) Wendy Turnbull
1978 Jimmy Connors (3) Bjorn Borg Chris Evert (4) Pam Shriver
1979 John McEnroe Vitus Gerulaitis Tracy Austin Chris Evert
1980 John McEnroe (2) Bjorn Borg Chris Evert (5) Hana Mandlikova
1981 John McEnroe (3) Bjorn Borg Tracy Austin (2) Martina Navratilova
1982 Jimmy Connors (4) Ivan Lendl Chris Evert (6) Hana Mandlikova
1983 Jimmy Connors (5) Ivan Lendl Martina Navratilova Chris Evert
1984 John McEnroe (4) Ivan Lendl Martina Navratilova (2) Chris Evert
1985 Ivan Lendl John McEnroe Hana Mandlikova Martina Navratilova
1986 Ivan Lendl (2) Miroslav Mecir Martina Navratilova (3) Helena Sukova
1987 Ivan Lendl (3) Mats Wilander Martina Navratilova (4) Steffi Graf
1988 Mats Wilander Ivan Lendl Steffi Graf  Gabriela Sabatini
1989 Boris Becker Ivan Lendl Steffi Graf (2) Martina Navratilova
1990 Pete Sampras Andre Agassi Gabriela Sabatini Steffi Graf
1991 Stefan Edberg Jim Courier Monica Seles Martina Navratilova
1992 Stefan Edberg (2) Pete Sampras Monica Seles (2) Arantxa Sanchez Vicario
1993 Pete Sampras (2) Cedric Pioline Steffi Graf (3) Helena Sukova
1994 Andre Agassi Michael Stich Arantxa Sanchez Vicario Steffi Graf
1995 Pete Sampras (3) Andre Agassi Steffi Graf (4) Monica Seles
1996 Pete Sampras (4) Michael Chang Steffi Graf (5) Monica Seles
1997 Patrick Rafter Greg Rusedski Martina Hingis Venus Williams
1998 Patrick Rafter (2) Mark Philippoussis Lindsay Davenport Martina Hingis
1999 Andre Agassi (2) Todd Martin Serena Williams Martina Hingis
2000 Marat Safin Pete Sampras Venus Williams Lindsay Davenport
2001 Lleyton Hewitt Pete Sampras Venus Williams (2) Serena Williams
2002 Pete Sampras (5) Andre Agassi Serena Williams (2) Venus Williams
2003 Andy Roddick Juan Carlos Ferrero Justine Henin Kim Clijsters
2004 Roger Federer Lleyton Hewitt Svetlana Kuznetsova Elena Dementieva
2005 Roger Federer (2) Andre Agassi Kim Clijsters Mary Pierce
2006 Roger Federer (3) Andy Roddick Maria Sharapova Justine Henin
2007 Roger Federer (4) Novak Djokovic Justine Henin (2) Svetlana Kuznetsova
2008 Roger Federer (5) Andy Murray Serena Williams (3) Jelena Jankovic
2009 Juan Martin del Potro Roger Federer Kim Clijsters (2) Caroline Wozniacki
2010 Rafael Nadal  Novak Djokovic Kim Clijsters (3) Vera Zvonareva
2011 Novak Djokovic Rafael Nadal Samantha Stosur Serena Williams
2012 Andy Murray Novak Djokovic Serena Williams (4) Victoria Azarenka
2013 Rafael Nadal (2) Novak Djokovic Serena Williams (5) Victoria Azarenka
2014 Marin Cilic Kei Nishikori Serena Williams (6) Caroline Wozniacki
2015 Novak Djokovic (2) Roger Federer Flavia Pennetta Roberta Vinci
2016 Stan Wawrinka Novak Djokovic Angelique Kerber Karolina Pliskova
2017 Rafael Nadal (3) Kevin Anderson Sloane Stephens Madison Keys
2018 Novak Djokovic (3) Juan Martin del Potro Naomi Osaka Serena Williams
2019 Rafael Nadal (4) Daniil Medvedev Bianca Andreescu Serena Williams

US Open Player Performance

Top Men

Player Titles Finals Main draw appearances Win-loss record 2019 result
Roger Federer 5 (2004-8) 2 (2009, 2015) 19 89-14 QF (lost to Grigor Dimitrov)
Rafael Nadal 4 (2010, 2013, 2017, 2019) 1 (2011) 15 64-11 Champion (d. Daniil Medvedev)
Novak Djokovic 3 (2011, 2015, 2018) 5 (2007, 2010, 2012-13, 2016) 14 72-11 R16 (ret. vs Stan Wawrinka)
Stan Wawrinka 1 (2016) 14 44-13 QF (lost to Daniil Medvedev)
Marin Cilic 1 (2014) 11 36-10 R16 (lost to Rafael Nadal)
Andy Murray 1 (2012) 1 (2008) 13 45-12 Did not play
Juan Martin del Potro 1 (2009) 1 (2018) 10 35-12 Did not play
Daniil Medvedev 1 (2019) 3 8-3 Runner-up (lost to Rafael Nadal)
Kevin Anderson 1 (2017) 9 22-9 Did not play
Kei Nishikori 1 (2014) 10 25-10 R3 (lost to Alex de Minaur)

Top Women

Player Titles Finals Main-draw appearances Win-loss record 2020 result
Serena Williams 6 (1999, 2002, 2008, 2012-14) 4 (2001, 2011, 2017-18) 19 101-13 Runner-up (lost to Bianca Andreescu)
Kim Clijsters 3 (2005, 2009-10) 1 (2003) 9 38-6 Did not play
Bianca Andreescu 1 (2019) 1 7-0 Champion (d. Serena Williams)
Naomi Osaka 1 (2018) 4 14-3 R16 (lost to Belinda Bencic)
Sloane Stephens 1 (2017) 8 19-7 R1 (lost to Anna Kalinskaya)
Angelique Kerber 1 (2016) 12 25-11 R1 (lost to Kristina Mladenovic)
Samantha Stosur 1 (2011) 15 22-15 R1 (lost to Ekaterina Alexandrova)
Svetlana Kuznetsova 1 (2004) 1 (2007) 17 35-16 R1 (lost to Kristie Ahn)
Madison Keys 1 (2017) 8 22-8 R16 (lost to Elina Svitolina)
Karolina Pliskova 1 (2016) 7 19-7 R16 (lost to Johanna Konta)
Victoria Azarenka 2 (2012-13) 12 34-12 R1 (lost to Aryna Sabalenka)

 

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