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Wimbledon 2021

The most iconic tournament in tennis makes a triumphant return in 2021 as Novak Djokovic, Serena Williams, Roger Federer, Simona Halep, Andy Murray and the rest of the stars head for Wimbledon once more.

Green grass and crisp whites will be the order of the day once more as Wimbledon 2021 takes place from 28 June to July 11.

Wimbledon Live Streaming

Wimbledon tennis is live from 28 June to 11 July 2021, with play starting at 11.00am BST. Bookmaker bet365 are offering customers the opportunity to watch a live stream of the match alongside in-play betting.

Watch and bet on Wimbledon tennis live at bet365 > live streaming > tennis (geo-restrictions apply; funded account required or to have placed a bet in the last 24 hours to qualify)

How to watch and bet on Wimbledon tennis:

1. Visit the bet365 website

2. Sign into your account or register for a new one

3. Select Live Streaming

4. Select ‘Tennis’ from the ‘All Sports’ dropdown menu

5. Enjoy a live stream & in-play betting for Wimbledon tennis, live from 28 June-11 July 2021.

PLEASE NOTE: You must have a funded account or have placed a bet in the last 24 hours in order to watch tennis; geo-restrictions apply.

Wimbledon Tournament Schedule

Qualifying for Wimbledon 2021 will be played from 21-24 June.

Main-draw play begins at 11am BST on Monday 28 June. Defending men’s champion Novak Djokovic will open play on Centre Court on the first day of Wimbledon, according to tradition.

Wimbledon 2021

Date – Time Event Name Location
Monday 28 June 11:00 BST Men’s & women’s R1 matches All England Club, Wimbledon
Tuesday 29 June 11:00 BST Men’s & women’s R1 matches All England Club, Wimbledon
Wednesday 30 June 11:00 BST Men’s & women’s R2 matches All England Club, Wimbledon
Thursday 1 July 11:00 BST Men’s & women’s R2 matches All England Club, Wimbledon
Friday 2 July 11:00 BST Men’s & women’s R3 matches All England Club, Wimbledon
Saturday 3 July 11:00 BST Men’s & women’s R3 matches All England Club, Wimbledon
Sunday 4 July Middle Sunday – no play All England Club, Wimbledon
Monday 5 July 11:00 BST Men’s & women’s R16 matches All England Club, Wimbledon
Tuesday 6 July 13:00 BST Men’s & women’s QFs All England Club, Wimbledon
Wednesday 7 July 13:00 BST Men’s & women’s QFs All England Club, Wimbledon
Thursday 8 July 13:00 BST Women’s semifinals All England Club, Wimbledon
Friday 9 July 13:00 BST Men’s semifinals All England Club, Wimbledon
Saturday 10 July 14:00 BST Women’s final All England Club, Wimbledon
Sunday 11 July 14:00 BST Men’s final All England Club, Wimbledon

All singles matches from all courts are available to stream live to bet365 customers with funded accounts.

Men’s, women’s and mixed doubles matches, as well as junior, legends and wheelchair doubles, are also available to watch and bet on live.

Wimbledon Order Of Play

Check back here for each day’s order of play when The Championships begin on 28 June 2021.

When is Wimbledon 2021?

Wimbledon takes place in 2021 from 28 June-11 July.

The tournament was cancelled in 2020 due to the global health crisis – the first time since the Second World War that Wimbledon has not been played.

But all the familiar traditions will return in force in 2021: Novak Djokovic, as the men’s defending champion, will open play on Centre Court on the first day of The Championships. Play will begin at 11am BST sharp on the outside courts and at 1pm BST on Centre, No. 1 and No. 2 Courts. And there will be no play on Middle Sunday – Wimbledon’s sacred day of rest for the grass courts, which allows everybody to regroup ahead of Manic Monday, the busiest day in the tennis calendar, as all 16 fourth-round matches in the men’s and women’s draws are played.

Wimbledon Players 2021

The pristine lawns of the All England Club have welcomed the best players in the world every year since 1877, and 2021 will be no exception. Multiple champions Roger Federer, Serena Williams, Rafael Nadal, Petra Kvitova and Andy Murray will all hope to write another chapter in their incredible winning story; Novak Djokovic and Simona Halep battle to defend their titles; and a host of contenders jostle to break through into the elite circle of Wimbledon champions.

Novak Djokovic leads the Wimbledon field as defending champion (Photo by Corinne Dubreuil/ABACAPRESS.COM)

Novak Djokovic

The indomitable Djokovic claimed his fifth Wimbledon title in 2019 when he saved two championship points to defeat crowd darling Roger Federer in five thrilling sets, and now trails only Pete Sampras (7) and Federer himself (8) on the Open Era winners’ list.

When he opens play on Centre Court on the first day of The Championships 2021, Djokovic will be beginning his quest to become the first player since Federer himself to win three back-to-back Wimbledon men’s singles titles.

Simona Halep

Romania’s Halep followed her maiden Grand Slam singles title at the French Open in 2018 with a stunning Wimbledon victory in 2019, playing the most magnificent match of her career to stun Serena Williams 6-2, 6-2 in the final.

The first Romanian player to triumph at Wimbledon, Halep received a hero’s welcome when she returned home bearing the Venus Rosewater Dish and will not relinquish it easily in 2021.

Roger Federer

Wimbledon’s favourite adopted son, Federer won five consecutive titles between 2003-7 and came back to claim the title in 2009 and 2012. For four years he was held off by the field – most notably Djokovic, who beat him in back-to-back finals in 2014-15 – but made a fairytale comeback after having had knee surgery in 2016 to claim the title in 2017, eclipsing Sampras’s mark of seven titles and becoming the most successful male player in Wimbledon history.

Continuing to defy the passage of time, Federer was narrowly defeated by Djokovic in the 2019 final after holding two championship points. More knee surgeries have followed in 2020, but Federer has made no secret of his plans to return in 2021 and Wimbledon glory will be at the forefront of his mind.

Serena Williams

It will have been 19 years since Serena Williams’s first Wimbledon title when she returns in 2021, but that will by no means diminish the threat posed by the greatest women’s player of all time.

Tied with Steffi Graf for second place on the Open Era winners’ list, Williams’s seventh Wimbledon title came in 2016 and she has yet to claim a Grand Slam since giving birth to her daughter in 2017. But she has arguably come closer at Wimbledon than anywhere else, making the final in 2018 and 2019, and will still be the favourite to make it an amazing eight in 2021.

Rafael Nadal

Nadal’s greatest Wimbledon moments may be a decade behind him now, but the memories of his 2008 defeat of Federer in a five-set final widely considered the greatest match ever played remain indelible.

Nadal’s incredible haul of 12 French Open titles have largely come at the expense of his chances to add a third Wimbledon to his haul, and he has not been in the Wimbledon final since 2011. But after a spell of early exits, Nadal contested the semifinals in 2018 and 2019 and currently challenges Djokovic at the top of the rankings, so the King of Clay is not to be written off on grass.

Ashleigh Barty

Not since Evonne Goolagong Cawley in 1980 has an Australian woman triumphed in Wimbledon singles, but Barty, who currently reigns as WTA world no. 1, might be the player to end that drought.

Blessed with a big serve and a vicious slice backhand, Barty may have won her maiden Grand Slam on clay at the French Open in 2019 but she has all the tools to succeed on grass, with titles in Nottingham and Birmingham to her credit.

Stefanos Tsitsipas

One of the fastest-rising stars in men’s tennis, 21-year-old Tsitsipas has already proved he marches to the beat of his own drum – a perfect fit for Wimbledon, which has a history of embracing quirky champions.

A semifinalist at the Australian Open in 2019, when he announced himself by defeating Federer, Tsitsipas has yet to win a grass-court title, but he claimed the biggest win of his young career when he triumphed at the Nitto ATP Finals in 2019.

Serena Williams is a seven-time Wimbledon champion (PA Images)

About Wimbledon

The oldest tennis tournament in the world, Wimbledon – also known simply as The Championships – has been held at the All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club (AELTC) in south-west London since 1877.

Of the four Grand Slams, Wimbledon is the only one still played on grass courts since the Australian Open shifted to hard courts in 1988.

The iconic event retains the traditional elements from tennis’s polite, amateur past; including a strict dress code for the competitors, who all wear white; Royal patronage; no play on the middle Sunday of the event; the absence of sponsor advertising around the courts; and the conspicuous consumption of strawberries and cream.

That doesn’t mean Wimbledon hasn’t evolved with the times, however. Prize money was first offered to competitors in 1968, the first year that professional players were allowed to compete in The Championships, and men and women have been paid equal prize money since 2007. With the unpredictable British summer often leading to rain, a retractable roof was installed over Centre Court and has been in operation since 2009, with No. 1 Court to be roofed. The All-England Club also features the Aorangi Terrace, a large outdoor area where fans watch matches on a giant screen, popularly known as ‘Henman Hill’ after British player Tim Henman. It is also known as ‘Murray Mound’ in recent years after Andy Murray became the first British man since Fred Perry in 1936 to win Wimbledon in 2013. Virginia Wade was the last British women to win Wimbledon in 1977.

Wimbledon is broadcast by the BBC on every day of The Championships and attracts huge television audiences around the world. New legends are added to the myth of Wimbledon every year, such as the 183-game match between John Isner and Nicolas Mahut on Court 18 in 2010, which Isner won 70-68 in the fifth set; and the iconic 2008 men’s final between Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal, widely regarded as the greatest match of all time.

Who are the greatest Wimbledon champions?

Roger Federer holds the record for most men’s titles at Wimbledon in the Open Era with eight, one ahead of Pete Sampras, while Federer (2003-7) and Bjorn Borg (1976-80) are tied for the most consecutive singles titles. Rafael Nadal and Andy Murray both have two titles, while defending champion Novak Djokovic has three.

On the women’s side, Martina Navratilova holds the Open Era record with nine Wimbledon titles and also holds the record for most consecutive women’s titles, winning six between 1982 and 1987. Among active players, Serena Williams holds the record for most titles with seven, edging out sister Venus’ five, while Petra Kvitova (2011 and 2014), Garbine Muguruza (2017), Angelique Kerber (2018) and Simona Halep (2019) have also captured the prize at the All England Club.

Wimbledon Records

Most titles (men):
Amateur era: William Renshaw (7)
Open Era: Roger Federer (8)
All time: Roger Federer (8)

Most titles (women):
Amateur era: Helen Wills Moody (8)
Open Era: Martina Navratilova (9)
All time: Martina Navratilova (9)

Most consecutive titles (men):
Amateur era: William Renshaw (6, 1881-86)
Open Era: Bjorn Borg (5, 1976-80)/Roger Federer (5, 2003-7)
All time: William Renshaw (6, 1881-86)

Most consecutive titles (women):
Amateur era: Suzanne Lenglen (5, 1919-23)
Open Era: Martina Navratilova (6, 1982-87)

Most finals reached (men):
Roger Federer has contested a record 12 men’s singles finals at Wimbledon to date

Most finals reached (women):
Martina Navratilova has contested a record 12 women’s singles finals at Wimbledon
Serena Williams is close behind her, having played 11 to date

Most consecutive finals reached (men):
Roger Federer played 7 consecutive singles finals between 2003-9, a record for the Open Era

Most consecutive finals reached (women):
Martina Navratilova played 9 consecutive singles finals between 1982-90, a record for the Open Era

Multiple-time final opponents (men):
No pair of players have contested more than three Wimbledon singles finals.
Four pairs of players have faced each other three times in Wimbledon finals:
Stefan Edberg & Boris Becker (2-1)
Roger Federer & Andy Roddick (3-0)
Roger Federer & Rafael Nadal (2-1)
Novak Djokovic & Roger Federer (3-0)

Multiple-time final opponents (women):
Martina Navratilova and Chris Evert faced each other five times in the Open Era, Navratilova winning all five finals
The only other pairs of players to have faced off more than twice in the Wimbledon final are:
Steffi Graf/Martina Navratilova (2-1)
Serena Williams/Venus Williams (3-1)

Winners without losing a set (men):
Only twice in the Open Era has a male player claimed the title without dropping a set:
Bjorn Borg – 1976
Roger Federer – 2017

Winners without losing a set (women):
On ten occasions in the Open Era, the ladies’ champion has not dropped a set. The only players to do it more than once are Martina Navratilova (4 times) and Serena Williams (twice).
2013 – Marion Bartoli
2010 – Serena Williams
2008 – Venus Williams
2002 – Serena Williams
1999 – Lindsay Davenport
1990 – Martina Navratilova
1986 – Martina Navratilova
1984 – Martina Navratilova
1983 – Martina Navratilova
1981 – Chris Lloyd

Most singles matches played at Wimbledon (men):
114 – Roger Federer
102 – Jimmy Connors
90 – Arthur Gore
86 – Ritchie Major
83 – Boris Becker
82 – Novak Djokovic
74 – Roy Emerson
70 – Pete Sampras
70 – John McEnroe
69 – Bunny Austin
67 – Andy Murray

Most singles matches played at Wimbledon (women):
134 – Martina Navratilova
111 – Chris Evert
110 – Serena Williams
110 – Billie Jean King
106 – Venus Williams
87 – Virginia Wade
81 – Steffi Graf
70 – Ann Haydon
66 – Helen Jacobs
66 – Rosie Casals

Most games in a match:
Men’s singles – 183 (John Isner d. Nicholas Mahut, 2010)
Women’s singles – 58 (Chanda Rubin d. Patricia Hy-Boulais, 1995)
Men’s doubles – 102 (Marcelo Melo/Andre Sa d. Paul Hanley/Kevin Ullyet, 2007)
Women’s doubles – 50 (Martina Hingis/Arantxa Sachez-Vicario d. Chanda Rubin/Brenda Schultz-McCarthy, 1997)
Mixed doubles – 77 (Michael Schapers/Brenda Shultz d. Tom Nijssen/Andrea Temesvari, 1991)

Best tie-break record (men):
56-21 – Roger Federer
41-24 – Goran Ivanisevic
36-18 – Novak Djokovic
35-20 – Andy Roddick
35-22 – Boris Becker
34-20 – Ivan Lendl
32-20 – Pete Sampras
31-15 – John Isner
28-23 – Tomas Berdych
27-12 – John McEnroe
27-16 – Feliciano Lopez

Best tie-break record (women):
17-11 – Venus Williams
13-2 – Martina Navratilova
12-9 – Serena Williams
8-2 – Catarina Lindqvist
7-1 – Kimiko Date-Krumm
7-1 – Camila Giorgi
7-1 – Francesca Schiavone
7-1 – CoCo Vandeweghe
7-2 – Daniela Hantuchova
7-2 – Ana Ivanovic
7-2 – Wendy Prausa

Longest match by time (men):
John Isner d. Nicolas Mahut 6-4, 3-6, 6-7(7), 7-6(3), 70-68 (first round, 2010) – 11 hours and 5 minutes (longest professional tennis match ever played)

Longest match by time (women):
Chanda Rubin d. Patricia Hy-Boulais 7-6(4), 6-7(5), 17-15 (second round, 1995) – 3 hours and 45 minutes

Longest match by games (men):
John Isner d. Nicolas Mahut 6-4, 3-6, 6-7(7), 7-6(3), 70-68 (first round, 2010) – 183 games

Longest match by games (women):
Chanda Rubin d. Patricia Hy-Boulais 7-6(4), 6-7(5), 17-15 (second round, 1995) – 58 games

Longest singles final by time (men):
Novak Djokovic d. Roger Federer 7-6(5), 1-6, 7-6(4), 4-6, 13-12 (3) (2019) – 4 hours and 57 minutes

Longest singles final by time (women):
Venus Williams d. Lindsay Davenport 4-6, 7-6(4), 9-7 (2005) – 2 hours and 45 minutes

Longest singles final by games (men):
Roger Federer d. Andy Roddick 5-7, 7-6(6), 7-6(5), 3-6, 16-14 (2009) – 77 games

Longest singles semifinal by time (men):
Kevin Anderson d. John Isner 7-6(6), 6-7(5), 6-7(9), 6-4, 26-24 (2018) – 6 hours and 36 minutes

Longest singles semifinal by time (men):
Kevin Anderson d. John Isner 7-6(6), 6-7(5), 6-7(9), 6-4, 26-24 (2018) – 99 games

Wimbledon Champions

Here is a complete list of men’s and women’s singles champions at Wimbledon during the Open Era.

Former Wimbledon champions (Open Era)

Year Men’s Champion Men’s Runner-up Women’s Champion Women’s Runner-up
1968 Rod Laver Tony Roche Billie Jean King (3) Judy Tegart
1969 Rod Laver (3) John Newcombe Ann Jones Billie Jean King
1970 John Newcombe Ken Rosewall Margaret Court (3) Billie Jean King
1971 John Newcombe (3) Stan Smith Evonne Goolagong Margaret Court
1972 Stan Smith Ilie Nastase Billie Jean King (4) Evonne Goolagong
1973 Jan Kodes Alex Metreveli Billie Jean King (5) Chris Evert
1974 Jimmy Connors Ken Rosewall Chris Evert Olga Mozorova
1975 Arthur Ashe Jimmy Connors Billie Jean King (6) Evonne Goolagong Cawley
1976 Bjorn Borg Ilie Nastase Chris Evert (2) Evonne Goolagong Cawley
1977 Bjorn Borg (2) Jimmy Connors Virginia Wade Betty Stove
1978 Bjorn Borg (3) Jimmy Connors Martina Navratilova Chris Evert
1979 Bjorn Borg (4) Roscoe Tanner Martina Navratilova Chris Evert
1980 Bjorn Borg (5) John McEnroe Evonne Goolagong Cawley Chris Evert
1981 John McEnroe Bjorn Borg Chris Evert (2) Hana Mandlikova
1982 Jimmy Connors (2) John McEnroe Martina Navratilova (3) Chris Evert
1983 John McEnroe (2) Chris Lewis Martina Navratilova (4) Andrea Jaeger
1984 John McEnroe (3) Jimmy Connors Martina Navratilova (5) Chris Evert
1985 Boris Becker Kevin Curren Martina Navratilova (6) Chris Evert
1986 Boris Becker (2) Ivan Lendl Martina Navratilova (7) Hana Mandlikova
1987 Pat Cash Ivan Lendl Martina Navratilova (8) Steffi Graf
1988 Stefan Edberg Boris Becker Steffi Graf  Martina Navratilova
1989 Boris Becker (3) Stefan Edberg Steffi Graf (2) Martina Navratilova
1990 Stefan Edberg (2) Boris Becker Martina Navratilova (9) Zina Garrison
1991 Michael Stich Boris Becker Steffi Graf (3) Gabriela Sabatini
1992 Andre Agassi Goran Ivanisevic Steffi Graf (4) Monica Seles
1993 Pete Sampras Jim Courier Steffi Graf (5) Jana Novotna
1994 Pete Sampras (2) Goran Ivanisevic Conchita Martinez Martina Navratilova
1995 Pete Sampras (3) Boris Becker Steffi Graf (6) Arantxa Sanchez Vicario
1996 Richard Krajicek MaliVai Washington Steffi Graf (6) Arantxa Sanchez Vicario
1997 Pete Sampras (4) Cedric Pioline Martina Hingis Jana Novotna
1998 Pete Sampras (5) Goran Ivanisevic Jana Novotna Nathalie Tauziat
1999 Pete Sampras (6) Andre Agassi Lindsay Davenport Steffi Graf
2000 Pete Sampras (7) Pat Rafter Venus Williams Lindsay Davenport
2001 Goran Ivanisevic Pat Rafter Venus Williams (2) Justine Henin
2002 Lleyton Hewitt David Nalbandian Serena Williams Venus Williams
2003 Roger Federer Mark Philippoussis Serena Williams (2) Venus Williams
2004 Roger Federer (2) Andy Roddick Maria Sharapova Serena Williams
2005 Roger Federer (3) Andy Roddick Venus Williams (3) Lindsay Davenport
2006 Roger Federer (4) Rafael Nadal Amelie Mauresmo Justine Henin
2007 Roger Federer (5) Rafael Nadal Venus Williams (4) Marion Bartoli
2008 Rafael Nadal  Roger Federer Venus Williams (5) Serena Williams
2009 Roger Federer (6) Andy Roddick Serena Williams (3) Venus Williams
2010 Rafael Nadal (2) Tomas Berdych Serena Williams (4) Vera Zvonareva
2011 Novak Djokovic Rafael Nadal Petra Kvitova Maria Sharapova
2012 Roger Federer (7) Andy Murray Serena Williams (5) Agnieszka Radwanska
2013 Andy Murray Novak Djokovic Marion Bartoli Sabine Lisicki
2014 Novak Djokovic (2) Roger Federer Petra Kvitova (2) Eugenie Bouchard
2015 Novak Djokovic (3) Roger Federer Serena Williams (6) Garbine Muguruza
2016 Andy Murray (2) Milos Raonic Serena Williams (7) Angelique Kerber
2017 Roger Federer (8) Marin Cilic Garbine Muguruza Venus Williams
2018 Novak Djokovic (4) Kevin Anderson Angelique Kerber Serena Williams
2019 Novak Djokovic (5) Roger Federer Simona Halep Serena Williams
2020 Cancelled due to coronavirus

Top men

Player Titles Finals Main draw appearances Win-loss record 2019 result
Roger Federer 8 (2003-7, 2009, 2012, 2017) 4 (2008, 2014-15, 2019) 21 101-13 Runner-up (lost to Novak Djokovic)
Novak Djokovic 5 (2011, 2014-15, 2018-19) 1 (2013) 15 72-10 Champion (d. Roger Federer)
Rafael Nadal 2 (2008, 2010) 3 (2006-7, 2011) 14 53-12 SF (lost to Novak Djokovic)
Andy Murray 2 (2013, 2016) 1 (2012) 12 57-10 Did not play
Kevin Anderson 1 (2018) 11 20-11 R3 (lost to Guido Pella)
Marin Cilic 1 (2017) 12 29-12 R2 (lost to Joao Sousa)
Milos Raonic 1 (2016) 9 27-9 R16 (lost to Guido Pella)

Top women

Player Titles Finals Main draw appearances Win-loss record 2019 result
Serena Williams 7 (2002-3, 2009-10, 2012, 2015-16) 4 (2004, 2008, 2018-19) 19 98-12 Runner-up (lost to Simona Halep)
Venus Williams 5 (2000-1, 2005, 2007-8) 4 (2002-3, 2009, 2017) 22 89-17 R1 (lost to Cori Gauff)
Petra Kvitova 2 (2011, 2014) 12 33-10 R16 (lost to Johanna Konta)
Simona Halep 1 (2019) 9 24-8 Champion (d. Serena Williams)
Angelique Kerber 1 (2018) 1 (2016) 12 31-11 R2 (lost to Lauren Davis)
Garbine Muguruza 1 (2017) 1 (2015) 7 16-6 R1 (lost to Beatriz Haddad Maia)
Eugenie Bouchard 1 (2014) 7 11-7 R1 (lost to Tamara Zidansek)

 

Wimbledon tennis is live from 28 June to 11 July 2021, with play starting at 11.00am BST. Bookmaker bet365 are offering customers the opportunity to watch a live stream of the match alongside in-play betting.

Watch and bet on Wimbledon tennis live at bet365 > live streaming > tennis (geo-restrictions apply; funded account required or to have placed a bet in the last 24 hours to qualify)

How to watch and bet on Wimbledon tennis:

1. Visit the bet365 website

2. Sign into your account or register for a new one

3. Select Live Streaming

4. Select ‘Tennis’ from the ‘All Sports’ dropdown menu

5. Enjoy a live stream & in-play betting for Wimbledon tennis, live from 28 June-11 July 2021.

PLEASE NOTE: You must have a funded account or have placed a bet in the last 24 hours in order to watch tennis; geo-restrictions apply.