Australian Open

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Australian Open 2022 Live Stream

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Australian Open 2022 Schedule

Date Session Gates Open Play Starts Details
Rod Laver Arena Margaret Court Arena John Cain Arena Outside Courts
Mon 17 Day 10 am 11 am 11 am 11 am 11 am
Night 5 pm 6:30 pm 7 pm
Tue 18 Day 10 am 11 am 11 am 11 am 11 am
Night 5 pm 7 pm 7 pm
Wed 19 Day 10 am 11 am 11 am 11 am 11 am
Night 5 pm 7 pm 7 pm
Thu 20 Day 10 am 11 am 11 am 11 am 11 am
Night 5 pm 7 pm 7 pm
Fri 21 Day 10 am 11 am 11 am 11 am 11 am
Night 5 pm 7 pm 7 pm
Sat 22 Day 10 am 11 am 11 am 11 am 11 am
Night 5 pm 7 pm 7 pm
Sun 23 Day 10 am 11 am 11 am 11 am 11 am
Night 5 pm 7 pm
Mon 24 Day 10 am 11 am 11 am 11 am 11 am
Night 5 pm 7 pm
Tue 25 Day 10 am 11 am 11 am 11 am
Night 5 pm 7 pm
Wed 26 Day 10 am 11 am 11 am 11 am
Night 5 pm 7:30 pm
Thu 27 Day 10 am 11 am 11 am 11 am Men’s Doubles
TBA Wheelchair
Night 5 pm 7:30 pm
followed by
Women’s Singles Semifinal
Fri 28 Day 11 am 12pm
Not before 2:30pm
3 pm Mixed Doubles Final
Men’s Singles Semifinal
Night 5 pm 7:30 pm
Sat 29 Day 11 am 12 pm
7:30pm
followed by
12 pm Junior Final
Women’s Singles Final
Men’s Doubles Final
Sun 30 Twilight 2 pm 3 pm
7:30 pm
Women’s Doubles Final
Men’s Singles Final

Australian Open 2022

All singles matches from all courts are available to stream live to bet365 customers with funded accounts.

Men’s, women’s and mixed doubles matches, as well as junior, legends and wheelchair doubles, are also available to watch and bet on live.

When is the 2022 Australian Open?

The 2021 Australian Open begins live from Melbourne on Monday January 17 through to Sunday January 30, with the very best in men’s and women’s tennis battling it out at Melbourne Park for one of the sport’s biggest prizes.

Champions at the 2021 Australian Open

Here is a full list of the players who won titles at the 2021 Australian Open.

Men’s singles champion
Novak Djokovic

Women’s singles champion
Naomi Osaka

Men’s doubles champions
Ivan Dodig / Filip Polášek

Women’s doubles champions
Elise Mertens / Aryna Sabalenka

Mixed doubles champions
Barbora Krejčíková / Rajeev Ram

Wheelchair men’s singles champion
Joachim Gérard

Wheelchair women’s singles champion
Diede de Groot

Wheelchair quad singles champion
Dylan Alcott

Wheelchair men’s doubles champions
Alfie Hewett / Gordon Reid

Wheelchair quad doubles
Dylan Alcott / Heath Davidson

Wheelchair Women’s Doubles
Diede de Groot / Aniek van Koot

About the Australian Open

Known as the ‘Happy Slam’, the Australian Open has a history stretching back to 1905. It was then known as the Australasian Championships and then the Australian Championships, before becoming the Australian Open in 1969. The tournament has been staged in five Australian and two New Zealand cities before finding its current home in Melbourne in 1972, when it was played at the Kooyong Lawn Tennis Club before moving to Melbourne Park in 1988. This was when the event switched from grass to its current surface of hard courts.

Melbourne Park’s main stadium is the Rod Laver Arena, seating nearly 15,000 people and equipped with a retractable roof. The Margaret Court and Hisense Arenas round out the major stages at the tournament.

Almost every legend of tennis, past and present, has lifted either the Norman Brookes Challenge Cup or the Daphne Akhurst Memorial Trophy at the Australian Open. Until recently, Roy Emerson held the record for most men’s titles, winning his first of six titles in 1961 before dominating the tournament with five consecutive titles between 1963 and 1967, but he was joined in 2016 by Novak Djokovic when he claimed his sixth title (2008, 2011-13, 2015-16). Djokovic already held the record for most consecutive titles won in the Open Era. Roger Federer tied Emerson and Djokovic for six Australian Open titles in 2018, backing up his stunning comeback triumph of 2017 when he beat great rival Rafael Nadal in the final with a five-set victory over Marin Cilic in the final of 2018.

In 2019, Djokovic became the all-time record holder for Australian Open titles when he won his seventh, beating Nadal in straight sets in the final. The Serb extended his supremacy in Melbourne in 2020, defeating Federer in the Semi-Finals and Dominic Thiem in the final to claim an eighth title. Djokovic is unbeaten in Australian Open Semi-Finals and finals.

On the women’s side, Margaret Court won the Australian Open an incredible 11 times, including four times in the Open Era, finishing in 1973. 23-time Grand Slam champion Serena Williams, with her six Australian Open titles (2003, 2005, 2007, 2009, 2010 and 2015), holds the record for most women’s titles in the Open Era, while Margaret Court (1969, 1970, 1971), Evonne Goolagong Crawley (1974, 1975, 1976), Steffi Graf (1988, 1989, 1990), Monica Seles (1991, 1992, 1993) and Martina Hingis (1997, 1998, 1999) are tied for the most consecutive Open Era titles.

The last Australian to win the men’s title was Mark Edmonson in 1967, while Chris O’Neil in 1978 holds the honour for the women.

The Australian Open is broadcast live around the world. From 1973 to 2018, the Seven Network served as the host broadcaster before the Nine Network acquired the rights in 2019. The tournament is currently broadcast on 13 different networks around the world. Australian Open matches are also available to watch and bet on live via bookmakers bet365.

Australian Open History

With a history that stretches all the way back to 1905 (when it was first played at the Warehouseman’s Cricket Ground in Melbourne), the Australian Open has gradually grown in prestige to become the global juggernaut it is today – one of the four biggest prizes in tennis.

First branded as the Australasian Championships, and then later the Australian Championships in 1927 and finally the Australian Open in 1969, the tournament was not recognised as a major tennis event until 1924. The Australian Open’s rich history has seen it contested across two countries and seven cities, including Melbourne, Sydney, Adelaide, Brisbane, Perth, Christchurch and Hastings.

Due to its geographic isolation from the rest of the world, the Australian Open suffered in terms of attracting the superstars of tennis in its initial years. Many of the game’s greats such as Pancho Gonzales and Manuel Santana never played any form of the Australian Open, while more modern-day legends like Bjorn Borg and Ilie Nastase only competed once. Inconvenient scheduling around the Christmas and New Year period was also a factor in players opting to remain in Europe and America during the early stages of the Australian Open.

It wasn’t until well after the establishment of the ‘Open Era’ in 1968 – the date where Grand Slam tournaments agreed to allow professional players to complete alongside amateurs – that the Australian Open really began to take off as a worldwide juggernaut. The Australian Open moved to the Kooyong Lawn Tennis Club in 1972 and was played on grass until it was moved to Flinders Park (later renamed as Melbourne Park) in 1988. The ever-growing Melbourne Park precinct remains the location for the Australian Open today.

The Australian Open was played on green Rebound Ace courts until 2008, when tournament organisers opted to switch to blue Plexicushion, which is the surface still in play to this day. It was also the first Grand Slam tournament to feature indoor play due to wet weather or extreme heat, with the Australian Open leading the way with its three primary courts – Rod Laver Arena, Hisense Arena and Margaret Court Arena – all equipped with retractable roofs.

Why is the Australian Open called the ‘Happy Slam’?

For the better part of the last decade now, the Australian Open has been consistently referred to by players and fans alike as the ‘Happy Slam’. Why is this the case? There’s a combination of factors, including the feel-good vibe and nature of Melbourne in January, the top-notch and state-of-the-art facilities of Melbourne Park – the home of the Australian Open – and its easy-to-access location, with Melbourne Park located just a short walk from the central business district, allowing players and spectators smooth transport from the heart of the city to the tennis centre.

Roger Federer actually coined the term ‘Happy Slam’ during a pre-match interview a few years ago. This is because the general feeling amongst the majority of players is that the Australian Open is their favourite Grand Slam, with tournament officials genuinely listening to players concerns and wishes and acting accordingly to execute them, whether it be an increase in prize money or demands to build more stadiums with a roof, which allows players to compete when it’s raining or in scorching temperatures.

Also, being the first Grand Slam of the season also means that players are arriving in Melbourne fresh and relaxed after a much-deserved off-season, while it’s also the first time all the leading men and women are in the same place at once for the season – which in turn contributes to more feel-good vibes and a overall relaxed atmosphere.

Australian Open Statistics

Australian Open winners

Here is a complete list of all the men’s and women’s singles champions during the Open Era.

Former Australian Open champions (Open Era)

Year Singles Doubles
Men Women Men Women Mixed
1969 Australia Rod Laver Australia Margaret Court Australia Roy Emerson
Australia Rod Laver
Australia Margaret Court
Australia Judy Tegart
United Kingdom Ann Haydon
Australia Frederick Stolle and
Australia Margaret Court
United States Marty Riessen
1970 United States Arthur Ashe United States Robert Lutz
United States Stan Smith
Not held
1971 Australia Ken Rosewall Australia John Newcombe
Australia Tony Roche
Australia Evonne Goolagong Cawley
Australia Margaret Court
1972 United Kingdom Virginia Wade Australia Owen Davidson
Australia Ken Rosewall
Australia Kerry Harris
Australia Helen Gourlay Cawley
1973 Australia John Newcombe Australia Margaret Court Australia Malcolm Anderson
Australia John Newcombe
Australia Margaret Court
United Kingdom Virginia Wade
1974 United States Jimmy Connors Australia Evonne Goolagong Cawley Australia Ross Case
Australia Geoff Masters
Australia Evonne Goolagong Cawley
United States Peggy Michel
1975 Australia John Newcombe Australia John Alexander
Australia Phil Dent
1976 Australia Mark Edmondson Australia John Newcombe
Australia Tony Roche
Australia Evonne Goolagong Cawley
Australia Helen Gourlay Cawley
1977Jan United States Roscoe Tanner Australia Kerry Melville Reid Australia Ray Ruffels
Australia Allan Stone
Australia Dianne Fromholtz Balestrat
Australia Helen Gourlay Cawley
1977Dec United States Vitas Gerulaitis Australia Evonne Goolagong Cawley United States Arthur Ashe
Australia Tony Roche
Australia Evonne Goolagong Cawley
Australia Helen Gourlay Cawley
1978 Argentina Guillermo Vilas Australia Chris O’Neil Poland Wojciech Fibak
Australia Kim Warwick
United States Betsy Nagelsen
Czechoslovakia Renáta Tomanová
1979 United States Barbara Jordan Australia Peter McNamara
Australia Paul McNamee
New Zealand Judy Chaloner
Australia Diane Evers
1980 United States Brian Teacher Czechoslovakia Hana Mandlíková Australia Mark Edmondson
Australia Kim Warwick
United States Betsy Nagelsen
United States Martina Navratilova
1981 South Africa Johan Kriek United States Martina Navratilova Australia Mark Edmondson
Australia Kim Warwick
United States Kathy Jordan
United States Anne Smith
1982 United States Chris Evert Australia John Alexander
Australia John Fitzgerald
United States Martina Navratilova
United States Pam Shriver
1983 Sweden Mats Wilander United States Martina Navratilova Australia Mark Edmondson
Australia Paul McNamee
1984 United States Chris Evert Australia Mark Edmondson
United States Sherwood Stewart
1985 Sweden Stefan Edberg United States Martina Navratilova United States Paul Annacone
South Africa Christo van Rensburg
1986 No tournament
1987 Sweden Stefan Edberg Czechoslovakia Hana Mandlíková Sweden Stefan Edberg
Sweden Anders Järryd
United States Martina Navratilova
United States Pam Shriver
United States Zina Garrison
United States Sherwood Stewart
1988 Sweden Mats Wilander West Germany Steffi Graf United States Rick Leach
United States Jim Pugh
Czechoslovakia Jana Novotná
United States Jim Pugh
1989 Czech Republic Ivan Lendl
1990 South Africa Pieter Aldrich
South Africa Danie Visser
Czechoslovakia Jana Novotná
Czechoslovakia Helena Suková
Soviet Union Natasha Zvereva
United States Jim Pugh
1991 Germany Boris Becker Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Monica Seles United States Scott Davis
United States David Pate
United States Patty Fendick
United States Mary Joe Fernández
United Kingdom Jo Durie
United Kingdom Jeremy Bates
1992 United States Jim Courier Australia Todd Woodbridge
Australia Mark Woodforde
Spain Arantxa Sánchez
Czechoslovakia Helena Suková
Australia Nicole Provis
Australia Mark Woodforde
1993 South Africa Danie Visser
Australia Laurie Warder
United States Gigi Fernández
Belarus Natasha Zvereva
Spain Arantxa Sánchez
Australia Todd Woodbridge
1994 United States Pete Sampras Germany Steffi Graf Netherlands Jacco Eltingh
Netherlands Paul Haarhuis
Latvia Larisa Savchenko
Russia Andrei Olhovskiy
1995 United States Andre Agassi France Mary Pierce United States Jared Palmer
United States Richey Reneberg
Czech Republic Jana Novotná
Spain Arantxa Sánchez
Belarus Natasha Zvereva
United States Rick Leach
1996 Germany Boris Becker United States Monica Seles Sweden Stefan Edberg
Czech Republic Petr Korda
United States Chanda Rubin
Spain Arantxa Sánchez
Latvia Larisa Savchenko
Australia Mark Woodforde
1997 United States Pete Sampras Switzerland Martina Hingis Australia Todd Woodbridge
Australia Mark Woodforde
Switzerland Martina Hingis
Belarus Natasha Zvereva
Netherlands Manon Bollegraf
United States Rick Leach
1998 Czech Republic Petr Korda Sweden Jonas Björkman
Netherlands Jacco Eltingh
Switzerland Martina Hingis
Croatia Mirjana Lučić
United States Venus Williams
United States Justin Gimelstob
1999 Russia Yevgeny Kafelnikov Sweden Jonas Björkman
Australia Patrick Rafter
Switzerland Martina Hingis
Russia Anna Kournikova
South Africa Mariaan de Swardt
South Africa David Adams
2000 United States Andre Agassi United States Lindsay Davenport South Africa Ellis Ferreira
United States Rick Leach
United States Lisa Raymond
Australia Rennae Stubbs
Australia Rennae Stubbs
United States Jared Palmer
2001 United States Jennifer Capriati Sweden Jonas Björkman
Australia Todd Woodbridge
United States Serena Williams
United States Venus Williams
United States Corina Morariu
South Africa Ellis Ferreira
2002 Sweden Thomas Johansson The Bahamas Mark Knowles
Canada Daniel Nestor
Switzerland Martina Hingis
Russia Anna Kournikova
Slovakia Daniela Hantuchová
Zimbabwe Kevin Ullyett
2003 United States Andre Agassi United States Serena Williams France Michaël Llodra
France Fabrice Santoro
United States Serena Williams
United States Venus Williams
United States Martina Navratilova
India Leander Paes
2004 Switzerland Roger Federer Belgium Justine Henin Spain Virginia Ruano Pascual
Argentina Paola Suárez
Russia Elena Bovina
Serbia and Montenegro Nenad Zimonjić
2005 Russia Marat Safin United States Serena Williams Zimbabwe Wayne Black
Zimbabwe Kevin Ullyett
Russia Svetlana Kuznetsova
Australia Alicia Molik
Australia Samantha Stosur
Australia Scott Draper
2006 Switzerland Roger Federer France Amélie Mauresmo United States Bob Bryan
United States Mike Bryan
China Yan Zi
China Zheng Jie
Switzerland Martina Hingis
India Mahesh Bhupathi
2007 United States Serena Williams Zimbabwe Cara Black
South Africa Liezel Huber
Russia Elena Likhovtseva
Canada Daniel Nestor
2008 Serbia Novak Djokovic Russia Maria Sharapova Israel Jonathan Erlich
Israel Andy Ram
Ukraine Alona Bondarenko
Ukraine Kateryna Bondarenko
China Sun Tiantian
Serbia Nenad Zimonjić
2009 Spain Rafael Nadal United States Serena Williams United States Bob Bryan
United States Mike Bryan
United States Serena Williams
United States Venus Williams
India Sania Mirza
India Mahesh Bhupathi
2010 Switzerland Roger Federer Zimbabwe Cara Black
India Leander Paes
2011 Serbia Novak Djokovic Belgium Kim Clijsters Argentina Gisela Dulko
Italy Flavia Pennetta
Slovenia Katarina Srebotnik
Canada Daniel Nestor
2012 Belarus Victoria Azarenka India Leander Paes
Czech Republic Radek Štěpánek
Russia Svetlana Kuznetsova
Russia Vera Zvonareva
United States Bethanie Mattek-Sands
Romania Horia Tecău
2013 United States Bob Bryan
United States Mike Bryan
Italy Sara Errani
Italy Roberta Vinci
Australia Jarmila Gajdošová
Australia Matthew Ebden
2014 Switzerland Stan Wawrinka China Li Na Poland Łukasz Kubot
Sweden Robert Lindstedt
France Kristina Mladenovic
Canada Daniel Nestor
2015 Serbia Novak Djokovic United States Serena Williams Italy Simone Bolelli
Italy Fabio Fognini
United States Bethanie Mattek-Sands
Czech Republic Lucie Šafářová
Switzerland Martina Hingis
India Leander Paes
2016 Germany Angelique Kerber United Kingdom Jamie Murray
Brazil Bruno Soares
Switzerland Martina Hingis
India Sania Mirza
Russia Elena Vesnina
Brazil Bruno Soares
2017  Roger Federer United States Serena Williams Finland Henri Kontinen
Australia John Peers
United States Bethanie Mattek-Sands
Czech Republic Lucie Šafářová
United States Abigail Spears
Colombia Juan Sebastián Cabal
2018 Caroline Wozniacki Austria Oliver Marach
Croatia Mate Pavić
Hungary Tímea Babos
France Kristina Mladenovic
Canada Gabriela Dabrowski
Croatia Mate Pavić
2019 Novak Djokovic Naomi Osaka Pierre-Hugues Herbert
Nicolas Mahut
Samantha Stosur
Zhang Shuai
Barbora Krejčiková
Rajeev Ram
2020 Sofia Kenin Rajeev Ram
Joe Salisbury
Tímea Babos
Kristina Mladenovic
Barbora Krejčiková
Nikola Mektić
2021 Naomi Osaka Ivan Dodig
Filip Polášek
Elise Mertens
Aryna Sabalenka
Barbora Krejčiková
Rajeev Ram

Greatest Australian Open champions

Almost all of the biggest names in the history of tennis have won the Australian Open title.

Until recently, there was a three-way tie at the top of the men’s honour roll with Roy Emerson, Roger Federer and Novak Djokovic each having won six titles. But Djokovic’s 2019 triumph saw him take the overall lead with an all-time record of seven Australian Open titles, followed by Emerson and Federer on six – a lead that Djokovic extended in 2020 when he won an eighth Australian Open title.

Federer has won a record 100 singles matches at the Australian Open.

Other multiple-time winners of the tournament include Jack Crawford, Ken Rosewall, Andre Agassi, Rod Laver, Mats Wilander, Jim Courier, Ivan Lendl, Stefan Edberg, John Newcombe and Guillermo Vilas.

Margaret Court owns the record for the most titles on the women’s side with a staggering 11 triumphs in the Amateur and Open Era, with Serena Williams not too far behind with seven. Victoria Azarenka is the only other current active female player with multiple Australian Open titles, winning back-to-back in 2012-13, while legends such as Evonne Goolagong Cawley, Monica Seles, Steffi Graf and Martin Hingis have all reigned supreme at Melbourne Park over the years.

Australian Open records (Open Era)

Longest men’s match (time) – Australian Open 2012 final: Novak Djokovic def. Rafael Nadal 5-7 6-4 6-2 6-7(5) 7-5 in five hours and 53 minutes.
Longest women’s match (time) – Australian Open 2011 R16:  Francesca Schiavone def. Svetlana Kuznetsova, 6–4 1–6 16–14.
Longest men’s match (total games: 84) – Australian Open 2017 first round: Ivo Karlovic def. Horacio Zeballos 6-7(6) 3-6 7-5 6-2 22-20.
Longest women’s match (total games: 48) – Australian Open 1996 quarter-finals: Chanda Rubin def. Arantxa Sanchez-Vicario 6-4 2-6 16-14 and Australian Open 2018 third round: Simona Halep def. Lauren Davis 4-6 6-4 15-13
Hottest tournament: 2009 – the 2009 Australian Open was the warmest on record, with an average daily maximum of 34.7 degrees Celsius, 9 degrees above normal.

The 2022 Australian Open is live from Melbourne from January 17-30, and matches from all courts will be streamed live.

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