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WTA Italian Open Rome

Latest WTA Italian Open Rome News

WTA Rome 2020 will now take place from 14-21 September. Watch and bet on Internazionali BNL d’Italia tennis live and get WTA Italian Open Rome live stream access with livetennis.com.

WTA Rome Live Streaming

Internazionali BNL d’Italia tennis is live from the Foro Italico in Rome, Italy from 14-21 September, with play starting around 11am local/10am BST. Bookmaker bet365 are offering customers the opportunity to watch a live stream of the matches alongside in-play betting.

Watch and bet on WTA tennis live at bet365 > live streaming > tennis (geo-restrictions apply; funded account required or to have placed a bet in the last 24 hours to qualify)

How to watch & bet on WTA tennis

1. Visit the bet365 website

2. Sign into your account or register for a new one

3. Select Live Streaming

4. Select ‘Tennis’ from the ‘All Sports’ drop down menu

5. Enjoy a live stream & in-play betting for WTA Internazionali BNL d’Italia tennis, live from Rome from 14-21 September 2020

PLEASE NOTE: You must have a funded account or have placed a bet in the last 24 hours in order to watch tennis; geo-restrictions apply.

WTA Rome 2020 Tournament Schedule

Internazionali BNL d’Italia 2020

Date – Time Event Name Location
Monday 14 September 10am BST Men’s & women’s R1 matches Foro Italico
Tuesday 15 September 10am BST Men’s & women’s R1 & R2 matches Foro Italico
Wednesday 16 September 10am BST Men’s & women’s R2 matches Foro Italico
Thursday 17 September 10am BST Men’s & women’s R2 matches Foro Italico
Friday 18 September 10am BST Men’s & women’s R16 matches Foro Italico
Saturday 19 September 10am BST Men’s & women’s QF matches Foro Italico
Sunday 20 September 11am BST Men’s & women’s SF matches Foro Italico
Monday 21 September 12pm BST Men’s & women’s finals Foro Italico

When is the 2020 Italian Open?

The Internazionali BNL d’Italia will take place in September this year as part of a rescheduled, compressed clay-court season.

Despite the impact of the global health crisis, some of the biggest events of the European clay season are still taking place – they have just been moved from May to September.

The 2020 Italian Open will take place from 14-21 September, between the US Open (31 August-13 September) and Roland Garros (28 September-11 October).

The Italian Open returns to its usual calendar slot of early May in 2021.

Elina Svitolina is a two-time champion at the WTA Internazionali BNL d’Italia (Credit Image: © Giampiero Sposito/Pacific Press via ZUMA Wire)

WTA Italian Open Players 2020

The 2020 Internazionali BNL d’Italia boasts a fantastic women’s field led by world no. 2 Simona Halep and defending champion Karolina Pliskova.

The WTA Premier-5 in Rome marks the return to action of two-time champion Elina Svitolina, Kiki Bertens and Belinda Bencic, among others, while Australian Open winner Sofia Kenin is among those who have headed back to Europe after the US Open.

Simona Halep

World no. 2 Halep won the French Open on her third appearance in the final in 2018, then delivered a sensational performance to add Wimbledon to her title haul in 2019.

Halep has made the Internazionali BNL d’Italia semifinals twice and finished runner-up to Elina Svitolina twice, so she’s been knocking on the door at the Foro Italico for some time and will be absolutely one of the favourites for the title.

The Romanian was 10-2 in 2020 before the shutdown and picked up right where she left off when she won the clay-court Prague Open on her return to competition, defeating Elise Mertens in the final to claim her 21st WTA career title, improve to 15-2 in 2020 and extend her winning streak to nine matches.

Karolina Pliskova

The big-serving Czech hasn’t always been thought of as a clay-courter, but Pliskova has had steadily more impressive results on that surface, reaching the semifinals of the French Open in 2017, winning Stuttgart and putting together a 9-match winning streak on clay in 2018 and in 2019, capturing the Internazionali BNL d’Italia title when she defeated Johanna Konta in the final.

Pliskova already has a title under her belt for 2020, winning Brisbane in the first week of the season, and will be battling to defend her title in Rome. After a disappointing trip to the USA, which saw her exit in the second round of the US Open, Pliskova will be keen to improve her form on clay.

Elina Svitolina

Currently ranked world no. 5, Ukraine’s Svitolina has flourished in Rome, winning back-to-back Italian Open titles in 2017 and 2018 when she defeated Halep in both finals.

Svitolina’s 10-match winning streak at the Foro Italico was snapped by Victoria Azarenka in 2019, but the former French Open quarterfinalist already has a title under her belt for 2020 and will be keen to re-establish her dominance in Rome in September. She has pulled out of the US Open.

Kiki Bertens

World no. 7 Bertens is another top-10 WTA player who has pulled out of the US Open, specifically citing Rome as a tournament she is prioritizing instead.

Bertens claimed one of the biggest titles of the clay-court season in 2019 when she won the Mutua Madrid Open, and was a French Open semifinalist in 2016. The powerful Dutch player has begun to win big titles on hard courts as well as clay, claiming titles in Cincinnati, Seoul and St Petersburg over the past three years, but remains a formidable threat on the dirt. She made the semifinals in Rome in 2017 and 2019.

Garbine Muguruza

French Open champion in 2016 and at Wimbledon in 2017, beating a Williams sister in each final, Spain’s Garbine Muguruza is a formidable player on all surfaces – and after a couple of years of lacklustre results, she is now reunited with Conchita Martinez and on the upswing, reaching the final of the Australian Open in January.

Muguruza has made the semifinals twice in Rome and could be a force to be reckoned with at the Internazionali BNL d’Italia in September.

WTA Rome Tournament Information

WTA Italian Open Internazionali BNL d’Italia
Dates 14-21 September 2020
Location Rome, Italy
Venue Foro Italico
Surface Outdoor red clay
Category ATP Masters 1000/WTA Premier-5
Draw size 56 singles/24 doubles
First played 2002
Most titles Men: Rafael Nadal (9)

Women: Chris Evert (5)

Prize money ATP: €5,791,280
WTA: US$3,452,538
Reigning champions Men’s singles: Rafael Nadal

Women’s singles: Karolina Pliskova

Men’s doubles: Juan-Sebastian Cabal/Robert Farah

Women’s doubles: Victoria Azarenka/Ashleigh Barty

About the Italian Open

The Italian Open, now known as the Internazionali BNL d’Italia, has a long and prestigious history as a women’s tournament as much as a men’s.

What is now known as WTA Rome was first played in 1930 in Milan, when Spain’s Lili Alvarez – now known as a feminist author and journalist as well as a tennis champion – won the inaugural edition. In 1935, the tournament moved to Rome, finding its home at the Mussolini-built Foro Italico, now one of tennis’s most recognizable venues thanks to its 1930s architecture and gladiatorial statues.

The Italian Open has also been played in Turin, Perugia and Taranto, but it has always returned to Rome before too long and has been played at the Foro Italico every year since 1987. Sadly for the home crowds, no Italian woman has won the title in that time – the last homegrown women’s champion was Raffaella Reggi in 1985, although Sara Errani did reach the final in 2014, losing to Serena Williams.

What is now known as the Internazionali BNL d’Italia remains one of the highlights of the European clay-court season and the WTA calendar in general. One of five ‘Premier-5’-category tournaments, which offer 900 ranking points to the winner and prize money of $2 million, the Italian Open is the last big tournament ahead of the French Open. So, in addition to the desire to win such a prestigious tournament for its own sake, players also battle particularly fiercely at the Foro Italico to establish themselves as contenders for Roland Garros.

Since 1987, Steffi Graf (1987), Monica Seles (1990), Serena Williams (2002, 2013) and Maria Sharapova (2012) have won the Italian Open and French Open in the same year.

Many of tennis’s most iconic female champions have triumphed at the Internazionali BNL d’Italia, including Billie Jean King, Evonne Goolagong, Steffi Graf, Venus Williams and Kim Clijsters. Monica Seles and Martina Hingis won multiple titles, while Gabriela Sabatini won four titles in five years between 1988 and 1992 and Conchita Martinez won four in a row from 1993 to 1996. No other player has so far tied Chris Evert’s record of five titles in Rome, however; the American won in 1974-5, and then claimed three straight from 1980-2, reaching the final twice more to boot.

In recent times it’s Serena Williams who has won the most Internazionali BNL d’Italia titles, although it was not for 11 years after she first triumphed in 2002 beating sister Venus in the final that she would win a second in Rome. Williams’s haul currently stands at four, most recently winning an all-American final against Madison Keys in 2016 – could she tie or even overtake Evert’s record before she’s done?

WTA Rome Ranking Points

Round Points
Champion 900
Runner-up 585
Semifinalist 350
Quarterfinal 190
R16 105
R32 60
R64 1

 

Italian Open Champions

Here is a complete list of players who have won singles titles at the Internazionali BNL d’Italia since the tournament’s first Open Era edition in 1969.

Year Men’s Champion Men’s Runner-up Women’s Champion Women’s Runner-up
1969 John Newcombe Tony Roche Julie Heldman Kerry Melville
1970 Ilie Nastase Jan Kodes Billie Jean King Julie Heldman
1971 Rod Laver (2) Jan Kodes Virginia Wade Helga Niessen Masthoff
1972 Manuel Orantes Jan Kodes Linda Tuero Olga Morozova
1973 Ilie Nastase (2) Manuel Orantes Evonne Goolagong Chris Evert
1974 Bjorn Borg Ilie Nastase Chris Evert Martina Navratilova
1975 Raul Ramirez Manuel Orantes Chris Evert (2) Martina Navratilova
1976 Adriano Pannatta Guillermo Vilas Mima Jausovec Lesley Hunt
1977 Vitus Gerulaitis Antonio Zugarelli Janet Newberry Renata Tomanova
1978 Bjorn Borg (2) Adriano Panatta Regina Marsikova Virginia Ruzici
1979 Vitus Gerulaitis (2) Guillermo Vilas Tracy Austin Sylvia Hanika
1980 Guillermo Vilas Yannick Noah Chris Evert (3) Virginia Ruzici
1981 Jose Luis Clerc Victor Pecci Chris Evert (4) Virginia Ruzici
1982 Andres Gomez Eliot Teltscher Chris Evert (5) Hana Mandlikova
1983 Jimmy Arias Jose Higueras Andrea Temesvari Bonnie Gadusek
1984 Andres Gomez (2) Aaron Krickstein Manuela Maleeva Chris Evert
1985 Yannick Noah Miroslav Mecir Raffaella Reggi Vicki Nelson-Dunbar
1986 Ivan Lendl Emilio Sanchez Not played Not played
1987 Mats Wilander Martin Jaite Steffi Graf Gabriela Sabatini
1988 Ivan Lendl (2) Guillermo Perez Roldan Gabriela Sabatini Helen Kelesi
1989 Alberto Mancini Andre Agassi Gabriela Sabatini (2) Arantxa Sanchez-Vicario
1990 Thomas Muster Andrei Chesnokov Monica Seles Martina Navratilova
1991 Emilio Sanchez Alberto Mancini Gabriela Sabatini (3) Monica Seles
1992 Jim Courier Carlos Costa Gabriela Sabatini (4) Monica Seles (2)
1993 Jim Courier (2) Goran Ivanisevic Conchita Martinez Gabriela Sabatini (2)
1994 Pete Sampras Boris Becker Conchita Martinez (2) Martina Navratilova
1995 Thomas Muster (2) Sergi Bruguera Conchita Martinez (3) Arantxa Sanchez Vicario
1996 Thomas Muster (3) Richard Krajicek Conchita Martinez (4) Martina Hingis
1997 Alex Corretja Marcelo Rios Mary Pierce Conchita Martinez
1998 Marcelo Rios Alberto Costa Martina Hingis Venus Williams
1999 Gustavo Kuerten Patrick Rafter Venus Williams Mary Pierce
2000 Magnus Norman Gustavo Kuerten Monica Seles (2) Amelie Mauresmo
2001 Juan Carlos Ferrero Gustavo Kuerten Jelena Dokic Amelie Mauresmo
2002 Andre Agassi Tommy Haas Serena Williams Justine Henin
2003 Felix Mantilla Roger Federer Kim Clijsters Amelie Mauresmo
2004 Carlos Moya David Nalbandian Amelie Mauresmo Jennifer Capriati
2005 Rafael Nadal Guillermo Coria Amelie Mauresmo (2) Patty Schnyder
2006 Rafael Nadal (2) Roger Federer Martina Hingis (2) Dinara Safina
2007 Rafael Nadal (3) Fernando Gonzalez Jelena Jankovic Svetlana Kuznetsova
2008 Novak Djokovic Stan Wawrinka Jelena Jankovic (2) Alize Cornet
2009 Rafael Nadal (4) Novak Djokovic Dinara Safina Svetlana Kuznetsova
2010 Rafael Nadal (5) David Ferrer Maria Jose Martinez Sanchez Jelena Jankovic
2011 Novak Djokovic (2) Rafael Nadal Maria Sharapova Samantha Stosur
2012 Rafael Nadal (6) Novak Djokovic Maria Sharapova (2) Li Na
2013 Rafael Nadal (7) Roger Federer Serena Williams (2) Victoria Azarenka
2014 Novak Djokovic (3) Rafael Nadal Serena Williams (3) Sara Errani
2015 Novak Djokovic (4) Roger Federer Maria Sharapova (3) Carla Suarez Navarro
2016 Andy Murray Novak Djokovic Serena Williams (4) Madison Keys
2017 Alexander Zverev Novak Djokovic Elina Svitolina Simona Halep
2018 Rafael Nadal (8) Alexander Zverev Elina Svitolina (2) Simona Halep (2)
2019 Rafael Nadal (9) Novak Djokovic Karolina Pliskova Johanna Konta

WTA Italian Open tennis is live from Rome, Italy from 14-21 September, with play starting around 11am local/10am BST. Bookmaker bet365 are offering customers the opportunity to watch a live stream of the matches alongside in-play betting.

Watch and bet on WTA tennis live at bet365 > live streaming > tennis (geo-restrictions apply; funded account required or to have placed a bet in the last 24 hours to qualify)

How to watch & bet on WTA tennis

1. Visit the bet365 website

2. Sign into your account or register for a new one

3. Select Live Streaming

4. Select ‘Tennis’ from the ‘All Sports’ drop down menu

5. Enjoy a live stream & in-play betting for WTA Italian Open tennis, live from Rome from 14-21 September 2020

PLEASE NOTE: You must have a funded account or have placed a bet in the last 24 hours in order to watch tennis; geo-restrictions apply.